how to make roost less smooth

Yakisugi Coop

Chirping
Oct 25, 2020
50
115
96
Fort Collins, Colorado
My Coop
My Coop
Our chickens have roosted on a 2'' wooden dowel for a year. I've noticed recently that they've started slipping on it when they're going in for the night and jockeying for position. It feels quite smooth and I think all their gripping on it over the past year has worked out the rough bits that probably gave them greater traction. Does anyone have ideas on how to roughen it up? Could I use rough sandpaper to make it less smooth or would that just continue the smoothing process (sorry if this is a dumb question, but google didn't answer it--it seems people rarely want to make wood less smooth)?

When we were building our coop, I remember reading one post where someone cut an old bike tube in half lengthwise and stapled it on the roost to provide cushioning/traction. I feel like there was a possible downside to that but I'm blanking on what that was (it's possible I just saw it as an unnecessary step). Is the bike tube a good idea? Anything else I could staple on that the chickens might take a liking to?

I should also note that they have a 2x4 with the wide side up that they could sleep on instead, but they never choose to do that so I'm prefer to do what I can to make their preferred dowel work (instead of, say, adding another 2x4 roost).

This is a photo taken last year before said smoothing of the roost occurred:

IMG_5310.jpeg
 
I seem to recall you went with a rubber mat in lieu of Black Jack 57. If you can get a small can of it, a well cured coat of that would offer some traction. I think a bike tire would also be fine. You could wrap it like a tennis racket handle. (At least, that's what I think I read of people doing.)
 
When we were building our coop, I remember reading one post where someone cut an old bike tube in half lengthwise and stapled it on the roost to provide cushioning/traction. I feel like there was a possible downside to that but I'm blanking on what that was (it's possible I just saw it as an unnecessary step).
One possible downside is that would give mites more crevices to hide in, and in their most desirable location - right under the chickens.
 
One possible downside is that would give mites more crevices to hide in, and in their most desirable location - right under the chickens.

This seems to suggest that wrapping the roost can deter mites:
https://www.yourchickens.co.uk/care-and-advice/the-perfect-perch-1-2842822
If you have a budding cyclist in your family, chances are they’ll be throwing out worn inner tubes. An inner tube cut lengthways can be wrapped spirally around your solid wooden perch and stapled or taped into place on the underside. Alternatively, you can use a solid rubber insulating tape (a 10m roll, 50mm wide and 3mm thick will cost around £7 from DIY stores) in the same way, wrapping spirally around the perch. As a hygienic perch surface is another important feature of a suitable perch, both of these wrappings are easy to clean should any manure accumulate. The wrappings may also deter red mites who like to live in cracks on the underside of wooden perches. The taping can also be easily unwound and replaced as necessary. Avoid using foam pipe lagging — it looks luxurious, but your chickens may eat it if they are bored!
 
Many ways I can see adding texture easily. Angle grinder or other power tools will easily put some texture on it in seconds. Smacking around a chunk of concrete/rock, perhaps rolling it on gravel or asphalt, etc. would likely do it quickly too. More likely I'd just find a tree branch to replace the dowels with. If going with a wrap, I'm thinking that would provide the most shelter to mites.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Back
Top Bottom