I dont think I am washing my eggs well enough...

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by wildpeas, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. wildpeas

    wildpeas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have been just spot cleaning my eggs with warm water as they haven't looked very dirty but I think that may have been a mistake. Last night both dd and I got salmonella poisoning from eating bread pudding made with our eggs. The bread I had also made with our eggs. Or maybe we are sensitive to duck eggs? I dont know but it was a horrible night for both of us and is going to be an unpleasant day as well. Ugh.
     
  2. Malibu99

    Malibu99 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sorry you're not feeling good. I'd call your state agriculture place and get your birds tested. I don't always wash my eggs. But to be safe, get 'em tested. Hope you feel better :(




    Eta- salmonella takes 4-5 days to appear, if I remember correctly. Could there have been something expired/ bad in the pudding?
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  3. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Our state ag department suggested that I not wash the eggs at all until right before cooking them. They think that any water on the eggs gives bacteria a free ride through the shell.

    They said just dry wipe them to get chunks off, then rinse them off immediately before cooking.

    I had some - er - intestinal distress the other day while the electricity was off. I offer you my deep, sincere sympathy. Ouch.
     
  4. Malibu99

    Malibu99 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oops. I had that backwards. It's 8-72 hours. 4-7 days to go away. Sorry 'bout that.
     
  5. If it takes 8-72 hours, could it have been something else you ate? We do not wash our eggs, as we heard that that makes the shell absorb bacteria. How do you know it's salmonella poisoning? If you know it's the eggs, I would get the ducks tested.
     
  6. wildpeas

    wildpeas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm just guessing it was the eggs because my daughter got sick the same night and we both ate it. Neither one of us has had any hints of being sick before dinner and I threw it all back up around two in the morning. Yuck. I'm doing better now as long as I stay sitting. I am sure the fault is mine, I doubt I was using warm enough water and the bacteria migrated inside and it's possible the bread pudding wasn't completely cooked. These things happen but I did tell the ducks I wasn't amused. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  7. Enchanted Sunrise Farms

    Enchanted Sunrise Farms Overrun With Chickens

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    i thought i read that salmonella is killed if heated to 160 for ten minutes. Looked it up and found this "Salmonella is killed by heating it to 131 degrees for one hour, 140 degrees for 1/2 hour, or heating it to 167 degrees for 10 minutes."

    So, i'm wondering if it was from the eggs. i only wash my eggs if they are super dirty.
     
  8. It could have been anything you both ate in the past 48 hours that got you sick--is your mayonaise getting old? How do you know it was salmonella?
     
  9. CGinJCMO

    CGinJCMO Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't wash your eggs in warm water...you want the water to be colder than the egg so the bacteria isn't drawn into the shell.

    I've been washing my eggs because the straw/hay in the nest boxes stick on the eggs (I assume the bloom or the brown coating is "juicy" and that's why it sticks).
     
  10. toadbriar

    toadbriar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry CG, this is absolutely opposite. Water should be at least 20 degrees warmer then the egg temp, to keep bacteria from being drawn inside the shell. This is why we mist the eggs with warm water in the incubator, too.
     

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