ib dark pied vs. ib split to white...

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by johnskoi, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. johnskoi

    johnskoi Chillin' With My Peeps

    dark pied vs. ib split to white.....is there a way to tell the diference when you're not sure of the parentage? ... such as subtle markings, eye color, leg color, etc?
     
  2. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

  3. johnskoi

    johnskoi Chillin' With My Peeps

    from deerman's post:

    "Dark Pied (having 2 Pied genes) will have white flights and white throat patches

    split to White (having 1 White gene)will have white flights and white throat patches
    "

    ...soooooo i guess without knowing the parents (or the hidden genes thereof), ya really can't tell till ya breed 'em...

    ...and ty for the link -- lots of CLEAR explanations [​IMG]
     
  4. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Keep reading. Arbor claimed that the split to White peas he's raised over the years vary in their appearance, and that none have had the white throat patch.

    Based on that, I'd think that if you have a pea with a white throat patch, it's probably Dark Pied, but might be split to White. If you have a pea with some random white feathers but no throat patch, it's almost certainly split to White, not Dark Pied.

    And if you're not sure, breed it with a White pea. If you get any White offspring, the "mystery bird" was split to White. If you don't get any White offspring, but get all Pied or Loud Pied offspring, the "mystery bird" was Dark Pied.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011
  5. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    To me only sure way is to breed them. Knowing what they are from ,is another sure way...dark pied only come from pied X pied mating. Thing about the white throat patch , can be few inchs long to just a few white feathers , right below the beak.
     
  6. Arbor

    Arbor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am posting this link on both related threads. In the picture of the 2011 hen, notice (you have to look closely) the white flight at the lower part of the wing close to the thigh. She is the offspring of a blue male crossed with hen that is blue split.

    http://ontario.kijiji.ca/c-ViewAdLargeImage?AdId=324076604&ImageIndex=2

    This has been my most typical blue split white offspring, and I find it very useful determining which offspring I would like to keep for producing whites if I don't have any.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011

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