I'd like to know what types of breeds of roosters that do not grow spurs ?

aurimilky

Songster
Aug 17, 2016
275
73
126
Then...maybe, you shouldn't get a rooster? :oops: Mind me asking why you want/need one, anyways? :)

I have a rooster alrealy running around my farm with his hens. I has a rooster to let the hens know there a predator around, looking to eat them.

Forgive me if I sound rude, but the others already are giving you great advice! :hugs Too bad 'none of those are options'? :confused: :idunno Are you absolutely positive none of those options/advice could end up working out after all? =)
??
Sincerely,
Cara

Yes the info is very good.
 
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Kajoda929

Songster
Apr 27, 2020
177
274
141
Central California
I'm sure this comment is a couple years too late now, but the comment about rounded spurs is what should have been clarified more...I have four breeds of chickens(27 total) and someone on a Facebook page brought up a "trimming station"...Dozens of people replied, clearly understanding the context, but I had absolutely no clue what you would even trim on a chicken(usually rooster)...I literally had to Google it. I have 27 chickens currently, had 31 previously, but had a few too many roos in the mix and all four breeds have short, rounded nubs as spurs. Not one has(or had) sharp spurs, though not one of mine is aggressive in any way to me because they know who the true alpha is. I actually made my chosen alpha roo before he was even old enough to be the alpha and the older ones submitted to MY choice. You spend enough time with them, they're pretty easy to manage, personality-wise.

The breeds I have, currently, are Black Ameraucana, Black Sumatra, Black Penedesenca, and Ayam Cemani(yes, there is a trend...I have a post about that Lmao)

I'm sure there are other breeds that are the same way, but the spurs on these four breeds couldn't hurt if they wanted them to.
 

varidgerunner

Crowing
7 Years
Aug 16, 2013
1,086
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There are strains of Ga Noi Don that have been selectively bred to not have spurs. They are traditionally used for fighting, in their home country of Vietnam. It's generally not a lethal competition, it's more of an endurance competition. It can be fatal, but usually the outcome is determined by which bird leaves the barrier that surrounds them. (which is like a foot high). This takes place in Vietnam, a match can last many hours, hence the breed's sparse feathering (very hot and humid). A bird can be valued very highly, a village champion might eat at the same table as his owner. The intensive daily handling required for conditioning forms a very special bond between these birds and their humans, thousands of years of selective breeding for this purpose has all but eliminated any traits of aggression towards human handlers. The purpose of selecting toward spurlessness was not for protecting humans, as other similar breeds that have spurs don't display any human aggression. This was done to lessen potential for injury to the birds, because those birds are so treasured, in a country that has long been impoverished by foreign and domestic conflict.

Traits like these are floating around in many game breeds. Roosters that hatch eggs, auto sexing breeds, and extremely laid back attitudes towards humans, high levels of intelligence (there are folks with birds that are basically obedience trained). But many people are so closed minded that they ignore thousands of years of selective breeding towards these traits because of the original purpose of that breeding. Unlike our savvy predessesors that recognized the potential of isolated genes, like pencilling, (which most likely came from games) and let us not forget the Asil component in the most popular broiler chicken.
 

Kajoda929

Songster
Apr 27, 2020
177
274
141
Central California
There are strains of Ga Noi Don that have been selectively bred to not have spurs. They are traditionally used for fighting, in their home country of Vietnam. It's generally not a lethal competition, it's more of an endurance competition. It can be fatal, but usually the outcome is determined by which bird leaves the barrier that surrounds them. (which is like a foot high). This takes place in Vietnam, a match can last many hours, hence the breed's sparse feathering (very hot and humid). A bird can be valued very highly, a village champion might eat at the same table as his owner. The intensive daily handling required for conditioning forms a very special bond between these birds and their humans, thousands of years of selective breeding for this purpose has all but eliminated any traits of aggression towards human handlers. The purpose of selecting toward spurlessness was not for protecting humans, as other similar breeds that have spurs don't display any human aggression. This was done to lessen potential for injury to the birds, because those birds are so treasured, in a country that has long been impoverished by foreign and domestic conflict.

Traits like these are floating around in many game breeds. Roosters that hatch eggs, auto sexing breeds, and extremely laid back attitudes towards humans, high levels of intelligence (there are folks with birds that are basically obedience trained). But many people are so closed minded that they ignore thousands of years of selective breeding towards these traits because of the original purpose of that breeding. Unlike our savvy predessesors that recognized the potential of isolated genes, like pencilling, (which most likely came from games) and let us not forget the Asil component in the most popular broiler chicken.


That was very interesting...I have made comments since I started raising mine about the fact that I chose my alpha of the flock and in a group with five males at the time(him not being the oldest or even largest), the other four conceded to my choice and didn't fight it. When I talk to them, they listen...When I sit with them and they "peck" at me or I feed them snacks, they can pick the tiniest crumb off my hand, leg, toes(when the treats fall from getting greedy) and I can't even feel it...I had one pecking at my hip the other day and felt a light brush...I hadn't even realized she was there, let along pecking my pants Lol There's more, but it's late, I just thought that was interesting and, if I'm not mistaken, only two of the breeds I have are actually game breeds...I'm curious if there truly is a connection
 

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