Idiot-Proof Breeding Program

Discussion in 'Quail' started by MEMama3, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have researched, studied and read up on all types of breeding styles for all sorts of birds and I feel I've learned nothing. I'm hoping someone can help me out here using "breeding for dummies" terms. I plan to get two flocks of forensic (1 male; 4 females) from two different sources. I was to breed for size and productivity using these two flocks.

    How do I choose which hens and roos to keep?
    How often do I "cross" the two flocks?
    Is there any way to track chicks without the super expensive numbered bands (any diy ideas)?
    How many hatches a season should I do to make sure I have enough options?
    I plan to sell the surplus chicks/grow-outs for meat, pets, breeders, etc.
     
  2. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dont know a whole lot, but as far as the bands, I use color coordinated zip-ties....the small ones come in all sorts of colors
     
  3. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

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    My Coop
    Depends on what you are breeding for. If you are going for size in your flocks, you would want to breed the largest female to the largest male for larger offspring. You can then breed these larger offspring, in hopes of larger still offspring.

    If you are breeding for certain patterns, you would chose the male and female with the patterns you most want.

    If you are breeding for gentleness, you would breed the most calmest hen to the calmest male.

    The main thing to remember is that genetics tend to perteptuate as time goes on. So never breed defective birds, such as feet issues, mental issues, health issues, crazy aggressive birds together.

    You can breed many generations together as long as you don't start to see traits that are not desirable of becoming bad of health. At that point, start with new stock.

    And ALWAYS start with quality birds. Birds that you KNOW are healthy and right in the head at the start.

    Good luck!
     
  4. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2013
    Vacation Land; Maine
    Thanks for the help so far!
     
  5. clawstar

    clawstar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I breed my disabled quail do you think her disabilities will pass on to her offspring???
     
  6. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it depends if it is genetic or not, for example, I have a quail that lost her foot in an accident, I can breed her wthout having any effected chicks. but I have another hen with a wierd beak, she was born with it. therefore i should not breed her because it will pass on to her offspring
     
  7. clawstar

    clawstar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She was born with it but she is a Texas white and her egg was ether bought at a well known factory or my science teacher neither would breed such a defected bird tho!!!
     
  8. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What exactly is the defect? the parents could have been of perfect quality and this just happened out of the blue
     
  9. clawstar

    clawstar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She is hunchbacked and her head is on her shoulder [​IMG]
     
  10. WaterfowlWierdo

    WaterfowlWierdo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If this was me, I would make this bird a "Garage Bird" these are birds that I keep in my shop, where they are in a warm draft free environment, where you can just spoil them. I have my one legged coturnix as a Garage bird, along with another hen with a sore foot. I dont breed my garage birds, they live in a minimal stress environment, and breeding can be stressful. She sounds like she was just a wierd mutation that just popped up in the lines, I would not breed her because that will pass to the offspring, but she is capable of breeding, keep in mind that the chicks will be inferior quality and some people look down upon breeding these birds as it just keeps creating problems down the line
     

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