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Inbreeding Question.....

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by littlecreekfarm, Oct 18, 2011.

  1. littlecreekfarm

    littlecreekfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 1, 2011
    Virginia
    Is it ok to inbreed you chickens? Like breed brother to sister?

    -LCF
     
  2. silkielover5

    silkielover5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 11, 2011
    Hudson WI
    you can breed parent to child. you could get defects from sibling to sibling
     
  3. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Quote:On a limited basis brother sister matings are not unheard of. You are better off with father daughter, grand-daughter etc. mother son, grand son, that type of mating tends to better establish lines.
    I have no idea what you are trying to accomplish but establishing a trait be it color, body type, laying ability etc. is best done in that manner. Line breeding is teh only method by which to solve problems and fully establish desired traits.
     
  4. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Quote:You will only see defects if teh matings were continued for quite some time or if teh genetic abnormality already existed, but the appearance of un-desired traits will be greater in full sibling matings. If there was one rooster and two or more hens involved you are likely quite safe in a 1/2 sibling mating on occasion as this is how multiple lines within a single family are established.
     
  5. littlecreekfarm

    littlecreekfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 1, 2011
    Virginia
    Thanks!
     
  6. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Groesbeek Netherlands
    Quote:Actually inbreeding percentage wise it doesn't matter.
    Parent to child does not mean that you don't get any defects.
     
  7. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2009
    the South
    Inbreeding should only be used with quality stock. It will set bad traits in a line as fast as good ones. You must be prepared to be a harsh culler to make it work with established goals in mind.

    I prefer breeding cousins or uncle x niece pens.

    If breeding brother x sister it is recommended that you only do it once every 7 or 8 generations.
     
  8. wclawrence

    wclawrence Chillin' With My Peeps

    Everyone has their own opinion on this. I do a lot of wide outcrossing, and a lot of tight inbreeding. Mostly what I do is Aunt-Nephew crosses or something similar.
    But I do not think it will cause problems unless the problems are already there hiding. I once made a brother-sister mating, then took a pair from that mating and mated them, etc etc for several generations. It will not hurt anything unless there is already something bad there.

    I don't want to sound mean, but asking a question like that is almost like asking what kind of chicken is the best to get. Everyone has their own opinion, based on something they read on the internet.... but will little to no actual experience.

    The real answer is: It depends. On your goals, and the birds in question.
     
  9. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Another important factor in this is the origin of your stock, if your dealing with pure stock you can generaly be Ok. But if your pairing hatchery mutts beware as it will be like a box of chocolates.
     
  10. Oldhound

    Oldhound Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 21, 2011
    South Carolina
    Quote:a visit to a library or an investment in books relating to genetics and breeding methods would prove helpful. This is not a subject that can be explained in a couple of sentences.
     

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