INCUBATING w/FRIENDS! w/Sally Sunshine Shipped Eggs No problem!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Sally Sunshine, Nov 1, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. As opposed to raining chickens???!!!?! :gig
     
  2. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Crossing the Road

    57,452
    10,121
    957
    Aug 23, 2012
    ZONES OF COLD INJURY / EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT

    I have had minor issues with cold eggs from the coops unless extreme cold/frozen, sometimes when it gets extremely cold and the eggs do freeze you should candle them to look for cracks, when you bring them in the cracks can easily be missed by our eye, but a candle you should see the small cracks. Brinsea ~ Temperature Guide and Optimal egg storage condition http://www.lohmann-information.com/content/l_i_46_artikel7.pdf
    Quote:
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Crossing the Road

    28,032
    15,289
    837
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Quote: That was my thought too.

    Extremely cold hardy for most breeds. Continental, English, American and some Asiatics can handle 20+ below zero F out of the wind.
    Those breeds were developed in cold climates over hundreds or thousands of years and I'm sure they didn't give them heat in the winter over all that time.
    Mediterranean breeds can handle those temps too but the roosters' big combs and wattles will get frostbitten (depending on humidity) at temps below 20F.
    I've had most Mediterranean breeds and never had frostbite on hens. It hit -19F a couple winters ago.
    Whimpy breeds like silkies, seramas ([​IMG]) and the like can't take such severe weather.

    Heat and bad air kills chickens, not cold. I've never lost a chicken to cold but I have lost them to heat.

    Even their ancestors - red jungle fowl - are adaptable to a wide range of climates, from tropical forest to Himalayan foothills. That contributed to success, spreading chickens across the planet.
     
  4. Pensmaster

    Pensmaster Free Ranging

    11,363
    10,623
    741
    Jan 10, 2014
    Northern California

    I was thinking of salt and pepper on those chickens. Here's a life size shaker of where I'm at today[​IMG]
     
  5. Pensmaster

    Pensmaster Free Ranging

    11,363
    10,623
    741
    Jan 10, 2014
    Northern California
    And here's proof of pouring chickens. Picture is of town friends live in and this is there coffee shop[​IMG]
     
  6. LittleLakePhil

    LittleLakePhil Crossing the Road

    22,870
    34,177
    890
    Sep 25, 2015
    Little lake Michigan
    I'll still respect you in the morning....:lau


    :hugs
     
  7. TJChickens

    TJChickens Songster

    1,976
    858
    226
    Mar 3, 2014
    East of San Diego
    I have kept them several ways. Under a heat lamp, on a heating pad, or in the parrot brooder. I get cold very easily and tend to baby everything with too much warmth if anything, but I would keep them between 85-90 for the first week. But since they don't run around, I prefer using a heating pad under the brooder and up one side where they can snuggle against it or move away a bit if they want. A stuffed animal helps.
    The babies I have right now are being taken care of outside by their parents.
     
  8. :rant
     
  9. Pensmaster

    Pensmaster Free Ranging

    11,363
    10,623
    741
    Jan 10, 2014
    Northern California
    Thought you'd enjoy. :gig
     
  10. Jessimom

    Jessimom Cats Rule Dogs Drool

    3,794
    1,186
    411
    Aug 21, 2009
    Southern California
    Really nice set up!! How hard is it for you to change out the bedding?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: