INDIANA BYC'ers HERE!

man_of_fishers

Chirping
Jan 13, 2020
88
137
78
Hey everyone! :frow Camping is winding down, other life events settled down for us, and will be back on here as a regular very soon!
I try to mention every early spring, and fall is a very good time to check your coop security. Fix a loose board or piece of fence, that type thing. In fall the wildlife are working on loading up on food for the winter, especially species that hibernate. Youngsters are cut loose from the parents by now and get bold! I've come out at dusk last few days and seen young raccoon and possum around my coops.
I might host a processing workshop for poultry and waterfowl early November, weather permitting. I've not offered any this year due to Covid, but With face masks and being outdoors it will work for a small group. I do not charge for this, so if you'd like to learn I'd be glad to share. Its also time for my fall Rooster/Drake roundup, time to clean up and downsize my chicken and duck flocks. I will have roosters and drakes if you need a bird, I do ask a donation for them. You can also BYOB of course free.. (Bring your own bird!)
I spotted a young opossum in my run last night! I shouted at him. So I’ve got a hole that’s big enough to be a problem for them getting in the run.

Love the idea of a workshop! I’ve processed one roo, but I’d be happy to get some more hands on experience as well as exchange other poultry knowledge.
 

man_of_fishers

Chirping
Jan 13, 2020
88
137
78
I had a pair a few years back and they were ADORABLE!
Very sweet and good Moms. Think @wheezy50 got them from me but can't remember for sure.

It sounds respiratory for sure. I would treat, if it helps, great. If not you know you've done what you can.
Good news! After five days of treatment, he’s sounding much better. No gurgle! Still not sure if the bare spot is due to a roo, hen romance, or something else.

 

Pollitos6

Songster
Apr 30, 2018
195
216
126
Hey everyone! :frow Camping is winding down, other life events settled down for us, and will be back on here as a regular very soon!
I try to mention every early spring, and fall is a very good time to check your coop security. Fix a loose board or piece of fence, that type thing. In fall the wildlife are working on loading up on food for the winter, especially species that hibernate. Youngsters are cut loose from the parents by now and get bold! I've come out at dusk last few days and seen young raccoon and possum around my coops.
I might host a processing workshop for poultry and waterfowl early November, weather permitting. I've not offered any this year due to Covid, but With face masks and being outdoors it will work for a small group. I do not charge for this, so if you'd like to learn I'd be glad to share. Its also time for my fall Rooster/Drake roundup, time to clean up and downsize my chicken and duck flocks. I will have roosters and drakes if you need a bird, I do ask a donation for them. You can also BYOB of course free.. (Bring your own bird!)
You are very nice by showing others how to process poultry. I would like to be able to process my own meat birds but the part I am having a hard time is when culling the bird. I can handle when the bird is dead but the culling part I don't know how to be strong for that. How do you pass that part? any advice?
 

Ninjasquirrel

Crowing
May 11, 2018
2,559
6,100
366
Northwest Indiana
You are very nice by showing others how to process poultry. I would like to be able to process my own meat birds but the part I am having a hard time is when culling the bird. I can handle when the bird is dead but the culling part I don't know how to be strong for that. How do you pass that part? any advice?
My fiancee and I went through this as well. He was not comfortable using the broomstick method. He said it made him feel "like a murderer". It seems to me the best way to do it is to find a method that you're comfortable with that doesn't cause the bird undue pain. Our resolution in our situation was for me to cull and him to process. However we did have a very sick bird that I simply could not cull for emotional reasons. He was perfectly fine putting her out of her misery with a 22 but once again could not use the broomstick method. I can not use a gun or an axe to cull. Theres just something about the permancy of the action that bothers me. Plus the blood. I also like to sit with the bird after they are gone, pet them and appreciate them, thank them for their sacrifice and ultimately allow their body to transition on as their heart stops. I feel I owe it to them to be there for them.
Anyways thats my advice, to find a method that works for you. I would be very interested in attending the work shop though. We kinda went in head first to processing and found it hard emotionally and physically a burden. Now we have all hens and only one roo so we dont have to do it. At least not until we start incubating. I'd like to be better prepared by then
 

Molpet

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
Sep 7, 2015
10,499
41,559
1,012
New Lenox township. Illinois USA
My Coop
You are very nice by showing others how to process poultry. I would like to be able to process my own meat birds but the part I am having a hard time is when culling the bird. I can handle when the bird is dead but the culling part I don't know how to be strong for that. How do you pass that part? any advice?
I watched how CX are raised for the stores and know my heritage/CX mixes have a good life and one bad day. ... instead of a miserable life.
I got a handful of CX, kept one for breeding, most were going downhill so it wasn't as hard. I used very sharp loppers because I was sqimish.
 

man_of_fishers

Chirping
Jan 13, 2020
88
137
78
You are very nice by showing others how to process poultry. I would like to be able to process my own meat birds but the part I am having a hard time is when culling the bird. I can handle when the bird is dead but the culling part I don't know how to be strong for that. How do you pass that part? any advice?
I've only culled a couple, and it's certainly not my favorite thing, but I think it's just one of those things one has to do a few times before it starts to not be as hard. I've used a sharp hatchet both times and both times it's went smoothly. After chopping, I immediately place the bird in a bucket so it doesn't run around. But I could absolutely see why someone might not want to use this method, as it takes a steady hand.

This past time, I took my 15 CX to an amish processor and it was cheap. But it was an hour away and took part of a day. Next time, I'm committed to culling myself. If I do that many, I'll probably go with the traffic cone method and very sharp loppers.
 

Pollitos6

Songster
Apr 30, 2018
195
216
126
My fiancee and I went through this as well. He was not comfortable using the broomstick method. He said it made him feel "like a murderer". It seems to me the best way to do it is to find a method that you're comfortable with that doesn't cause the bird undue pain. Our resolution in our situation was for me to cull and him to process. However we did have a very sick bird that I simply could not cull for emotional reasons. He was perfectly fine putting her out of her misery with a 22 but once again could not use the broomstick method. I can not use a gun or an axe to cull. Theres just something about the permancy of the action that bothers me. Plus the blood. I also like to sit with the bird after they are gone, pet them and appreciate them, thank them for their sacrifice and ultimately allow their body to transition on as their heart stops. I feel I owe it to them to be there for them.
Anyways thats my advice, to find a method that works for you. I would be very interested in attending the work shop though. We kinda went in head first to processing and found it hard emotionally and physically a burden. Now we have all hens and only one roo so we dont have to do it. At least not until we start incubating. I'd like to be better prepared by then
Thanks for you advice.
 

Faraday40

Free Ranging
Aug 1, 2013
9,666
13,472
611
Illinois
You are very nice by showing others how to process poultry. I would like to be able to process my own meat birds but the part I am having a hard time is when culling the bird. I can handle when the bird is dead but the culling part I don't know how to be strong for that. How do you pass that part? any advice?
It's a very hard thing to do - as it should be. Nobody enjoys killing, but for the sake of your bird and your conscience, you have to pick a method that you can do easily without hesitation.

I know many who bleed them using a cone. For me, I needed something quick. Logically, I know once the head is off, the chicken is dead. For quail, I could use sharp scissors. I'm not very strong, so for chickens, I needed a tool. I found this pipe cutter and it works for me. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-Flexible-Tube-Cutter-97642/304217583 I also need another person to help me through it. (emotionally) I set a date with a friend and just do it.
 

Pollitos6

Songster
Apr 30, 2018
195
216
126
I've only culled a couple, and it's certainly not my favorite thing, but I think it's just one of those things one has to do a few times before it starts to not be as hard. I've used a sharp hatchet both times and both times it's went smoothly. After chopping, I immediately place the bird in a bucket so it doesn't run around. But I could absolutely see why someone might not want to use this method, as it takes a steady hand.

This past time, I took my 15 CX to an amish processor and it was cheap. But it was an hour away and took part of a day. Next time, I'm committed to culling myself. If I do that many, I'll probably go with the traffic cone method and very sharp loppers.
I do have the info of an Amish processor but I think it will be good to learn how to process your own meat. My plan this year was to raise meat birds and take them to this Amish processor place. However, with COVID-19 everything was placed on hold. I strongly believe that knowing how to process your meet is a nice skill to have. This year was COVID, who knows what it will be next. I have read that using the cone is a good way to go. Maybe with practice I will get over it. I surely can't count on my husband for this, the most he has killed is a fly. Yep not the men for the job .
 

Pollitos6

Songster
Apr 30, 2018
195
216
126
It's a very hard thing to do - as it should be. Nobody enjoys killing, but for the sake of your bird and your conscience, you have to pick a method that you can do easily without hesitation.

I know many who bleed them using a cone. For me, I needed something quick. Logically, I know once the head is off, the chicken is dead. For quail, I could use sharp scissors. I'm not very strong, so for chickens, I needed a tool. I found this pipe cutter and it works for me. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-Flexible-Tube-Cutter-97642/304217583 I also need another person to help me through it. (emotionally) I set a date with a friend and just do it.
Faraday40 so with the pipe cutter you can cull a chicken's neck? does the whole neck fit in there? you mentioned that chicken bleed using a cone, so when you use the pipe cutter they don't bleed as much? also, do they instantly die or it takes a few minutes for the body to stop moving. I am sorry for so many questions. I hope it doesn't bother anyone in the forum. I am just trying to absorb as much information possible to find an easy, quick and effective way.
 

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