Info on Legal Importations of Birds and Hatching Eggs in To the USA

herechickchick

Songster
12 Years
Mar 28, 2007
2,585
13
214
Memphis TN
Ok I have seen lots of people with questions about Importing so as I have been doing a lot of research on this very topic I thought I would share my findings with you all.

All info regarding Rules and Regulations on Importing to the USA can be found here at the Unites States Department of Agriculture

To import Live Birds:

You must first make contact with a breeder in the country you wish to import from. Once you have done so and all of the arrangements have been made as to the purchasing of the birds you must contact the USDA to begin all of the necessary paper work.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines poultry to include chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans, and turkeys. All birds of these species are subject to the import requirements for poultry, and are not considered by the USDA to be pet birds.

USDA Requirements from countries other than Canada

- 30-day quarantine at a USDA Animal Import Center
- Animal Import Permit (VS Form17-129)
- Veterinary Health Certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the agency responsible for animal health of the national government of the exporting country
- U.S. Fish and Wildlife Certification

Import Procedures (from all countries except Canada)

* All poultry must be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days at a USDA Animal Import Center. The poultry must also be accompanied by a USDA import permit (VS Form17-129), issued prior to shipment of the birds. The importer must contact a USDA Animal Import Center to apply for the import permit and reserve quarantine space in the facility. Visit USDA for quarantine facility addresses.

* The poultry must be accompanied by a current veterinary health certificate issued within 30 days of importation and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the agency responsible for animal health of the national government of the exporting country. The health certificate must be translated into English.

* The poultry must be inspected by a USDA port veterinarian at the first U.S. port of entry. The importer must arrange for this inspection at least 72 hours in advance by contacting the USDA port veterinarian at the telephone number listed on the import .

* The importer must retain the services of a customs broker to facilitate the importation and, in some cases, to transport the poultry from the port of entry to the USDA Animal Import Center. The importer should contact the Import Center for a list of customs brokers to provide these services.

* During the quarantine period, all poultry will be tested to determine if they are free of certain communicable diseases of poultry. The cost for this diagnostic testing will be charged to the importer and is separate from the quarantine fee.

* Total payment of the quarantine and diagnostic testing fees is required when the import permit (VS Form17-129) (fillable pdf 75kb) application is submitted. The payment amount will be provided to the importer by the USDA Animal Import Center. The daily user fee rate for standard care, feed, and handling of poultry quarantined in a USDA Animal Import Center is as follows:

Doves, pigeons, quail $ 3.50
Chickens, ducks, grouse, guinea fowl, partridge, pea fowl, pheasants $ 6.25
Large poultry and waterfowl (game cocks, geese, swans, turkey) $ 15.00

Poultry imported from Canada into the United States are not required to be quarantined. However, the poultry must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued within 30 days of importation and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the Canadian government. The poultry must be inspected by a USDA veterinarian at the first U.S. port of entry.

An import permit is not required for poultry imported from Canada through a U.S. - Canadian land border port. However, if the poultry enters the United States through an airport, an import permit (VS Form17-129) is required.

Hatching Eggs Import Requirements:

* All hatching eggs of poultry imported into the United States must be accompanied by a USDA import permit VS Form 17-129 (except through a land border port from Canada).
* Current veterinary health certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the agency responsible for animal health of the national government in the exporting country of origin.
* Some hatching eggs are required to be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days upon entry into the United States.
* FDA Imported food requirement

Requirements for importing poultry hatching eggs differ for eggs being imported from countries designated and free of exotic Newcastle disease (END) than those not designated as free of END.

Poultry hatching eggs imported from countries designated as free of END

* The following countries are considered by the USDA to be free of exotic Newcastle disease: Australia, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Fiji, Finland, France, Greece, Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales, and the Isle of Man), Iceland, Republic of Ireland, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.
* Hatching eggs imported from these countries are not required to be quarantined. However, the hatching eggs must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a national government veterinarian of the exporting country as well as by a USDA import permit (see exception for Canada below).

Poultry hatching eggs imported from countries not designated as free of END

In addition to the required veterinary health certificate and USDA import permit, importation of hatching eggs from countries not designated by the USDA to be free of END are restricted as follows:

* Eggs must be transported from the port of entry to the hatchery in a vehicle sealed by the USDA.
* Eggs must be hatched and brooded under the supervision of the Area Veterinarian in Charge (AVIC) in the State of destination. The hatchery must meet certain biosecurity standards and be inspected and approved by the AVIC prior to issuance of the import permit.
* The poultry from such eggs must remain in quarantine for not less than 30 days following hatch.
* During quarantine, the hatching eggs and poultry from such eggs are subject to any inspections, disinnfections, and diagnostic testing as may be required by the USDA to determine their freedom from communicable diseases of poultry.

Poultry hatching eggs imported from Canada

Poultry hatching eggs imported from Canada must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a Canadian government veterinarian. However, no quarantine is required for hatching eggs of Canadian origin. Those hatching eggs imported through a U.S.-Canadian land border port do not require a USDA import permit, whereas eggs entering the United States from Canada via air do require a USDA import permit.

The import permit application (VS Form 17-129) can be downloaded from the Internet at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/forms.shtml or by contacting us at:
USDA, APHIS, VS
National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, MD 20737
(301) 734-3277 telephone
(301) 734-6402 fax

Flock of origin veterinary health certification statements

The health certificate must be in English or a complete English translation must be provided. The veterinary health certificate must accompany the hatching eggs while in transit and must state that:

* the flock or flocks of origin were found upon inspection to be free from evidence of communicable diseases of poultry;
* no exotic Newcastle disease has occurred on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises during the 90 days immediately preceding the date of movement of the eggs from such region; and
* as far as it has been possible to determine, such flock or flocks were not exposed to such disease during the preceding 90 days.

The flock of origin of hatching eggs imported from all countries except Canada are required to test serologically negative for egg drop syndrome (adenovirus 127), test negative on environmental culture for Salmonella enteritidis, and test serologically negative for viral turkey rhinotracheitis (avian pneumovirus) by a government approved laboratory. The flock of origin of hatching eggs from chicken-like poultry imported from Canada must be under a surveillance program similar to that of the USDA's National Poultry Improvement Plan.

All of this info can be found at the USDA website.

Now as far as shipping goes. That will have to be done with a commercial airline company such as Northwest. So you and the breeder will have to make those arrangements. From the people that I have talked to that have completed this endeavor say to expect to pay between $1000.00 to $1500.00 per bird when it is all said and done.

So as you can see it can be done it is just a time consuming and expensive project.

Keep in mind failure to import and export thru the proper legal channels can result in some VERY hefty fines and prison time so be sure to contact the USDA if you have any questions.
 

playswithfowl

One Earth!
12 Years
Jun 18, 2007
759
11
161
Oregon
Thank you for looking all of this up for everyone. This is a bunch of really interesting stuff. Now I want my dad to win the lottery even more!
 

Pine Grove

Songster
12 Years
Jul 18, 2007
1,028
17
184
Lakeland, Ga
Several ppl get together from BYC, Decide on a Trio, And put their money together. Designate a qualified keeper of the brood stock, Then share the offspring, Maybe every so often change keepers of the original trio.........
 

herechickchick

Songster
12 Years
Mar 28, 2007
2,585
13
214
Memphis TN
I am trying to Import some hatching eggs and if I am successful I will fill you all in. I do not want to talk to much about it now, I do not wan to jinx myself!
 

tx_dane_mom

Songster
12 Years
Sep 23, 2007
1,320
8
173
SE Texas
See, I think the eggs would probably be a more wise route to go than the actual live birds...JMO. I would think you would need to get like 2+ dozen though just to insure enough hatched to be worth it.
Have someone hatch them and split the chix hatched would be more my thought...
But what breeds are there that we don't have here that there would really be a demand for??
Kristi
 

herechickchick

Songster
12 Years
Mar 28, 2007
2,585
13
214
Memphis TN
There are lots of breeds that are not here in the USA. I am curious about the Marsh Daisy as well as Scotts Dumpy and if I can find someone willing to work with me one day I would love some of those.
 
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tx_dane_mom

Songster
12 Years
Sep 23, 2007
1,320
8
173
SE Texas
Is there like a *list* of breeds or something to see what all England has for instance that we might not?
Kristi
 

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