Introducing barring and lacing

JacinLarkwell

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I want to introduce barred and laced (preferably double laced) patterns to my Naked neck group. I have no idea the genetics behind their colors as the 4 are hatchery stock. I had planned to get a cuckoo marans and a barnevelder (maybe a laced Wyandotte too) to the flock and only keep any chicks that had the naked necks to see what I got. Is this logical or is there something else in forgetting?

Here's my quartet:
20201207_182316.jpg

20200916_182129.jpg

I have a black, white and maybe a partridge (?) Pullets and then my male that I have no clue what he even is.
 
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Egghead_Jr

Crowing
11 Years
Oct 16, 2010
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She's partridge, he's some mix.

You'd have to backcross a K from her then you'd have 50% partridge. Work on pattern from there. What you are forgetting is it takes two pattern genes to express. The cock pictured likely doesn't have a pattern gene. So to get there it would take F1 backcrossed to the dam that has the pattern.

That said, if you want naked necks then outcrossing to another breed seems counter productive as you've got a double laced (partridge) NN already.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
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She's partridge, he's some mix.

You'd have to backcross a K from her then you'd have 50% partridge. Work on pattern from there. What you are forgetting is it takes two pattern genes to express. The cock pictured likely doesn't have a pattern gene. So to get there it would take F1 backcrossed to the dam that has the pattern.

That said, if you want naked necks then outcrossing to another breed seems counter productive as you've got a double laced (partridge) NN already.
Yeah, but how would I get the barred and regular lacing without out crossing? The barred/cuckoo, whatever people call it, is what I'm mainly interested in.

I have no clue what a 'K' is, and I didn't know you need two pattern genes to express. How do sexlink work then? I don't know the genetics to all these different patterns, so outcrossinh was the only thing I could think of to even try getting them
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
11 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,535
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Barring or cuckoo will express with one copy.

In reading your first post it seemed you wanted any pattern and had a preference to a double lace which partridge is. Oh wait, guess it's triple lace.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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I want to introduce barred and laced (preferably double laced) patterns to my Naked neck group. I have no idea the genetics behind their colors as the 4 are hatchery stock. I had planned to get a cuckoo marans and a barnevelder (maybe a laced Wyandotte too) to the flock and only keep any chicks that had the naked necks to see what I got. Is this logical or is there something else in forgetting?

For white bars on black chickens, it's fairly easy because Extended Black is dominant, and Barring is also dominant. Because Barring is on the Z (sex) chromosome, you will get different results from a barred father vs. a barred mother.

If you get a barred hen (Cuckoo Marans, Barred Rock, Dominique, etc) and cross to your naked neck rooster, you'll get sexlinked chicks: males black with white barring, females black with no barring. Both genders are likely to have some other color leaking through in places-- look for photos of Black Sexlinks, because they will look a lot like that except that they will have naked necks too.

If you get a barred rooster and cross him to your naked neck hens, both genders of chicks should have white bars on black (again, with some other color perhaps leaking through.)


Laced and Double Laced are a bit more complicated, but because the naked neck is caused by a single gene, there's a fairly simple method to can get the naked neck trait in a bird of any color.

Get a chicken of the color you want, and cross to a naked neck.
Pick a chick who has a naked neck and cross again to the color you want. If you hatch enough chicks at this stage, some should be the right color.
Or you can pick ones that are close to right, and again cross them back to the color you want. (Continue crossing to the desired color for as many generations as you like, making sure to always have at least one naked neck in each pairing.)

By the time you've got the color right, you're likely to have a bunch of other traits from that breed too, so they may not be much like the original naked necks-- more like "Barnevelder with a bare neck" or "Laced Wyandotte with a bare neck."
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
16,153
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South-Eastern Montana
For white bars on black chickens, it's fairly easy because Extended Black is dominant, and Barring is also dominant. Because Barring is on the Z (sex) chromosome, you will get different results from a barred father vs. a barred mother.

If you get a barred hen (Cuckoo Marans, Barred Rock, Dominique, etc) and cross to your naked neck rooster, you'll get sexlinked chicks: males black with white barring, females black with no barring. Both genders are likely to have some other color leaking through in places-- look for photos of Black Sexlinks, because they will look a lot like that except that they will have naked necks too.

If you get a barred rooster and cross him to your naked neck hens, both genders of chicks should have white bars on black (again, with some other color perhaps leaking through.)


Laced and Double Laced are a bit more complicated, but because the naked neck is caused by a single gene, there's a fairly simple method to can get the naked neck trait in a bird of any color.

Get a chicken of the color you want, and cross to a naked neck.
Pick a chick who has a naked neck and cross again to the color you want. If you hatch enough chicks at this stage, some should be the right color.
Or you can pick ones that are close to right, and again cross them back to the color you want. (Continue crossing to the desired color for as many generations as you like, making sure to always have at least one naked neck in each pairing.)

By the time you've got the color right, you're likely to have a bunch of other traits from that breed too, so they may not be much like the original naked necks-- more like "Barnevelder with a bare neck" or "Laced Wyandotte with a bare neck."
Okay, so if I were to say get 3 males, (barred, laced and double laced) and bred them each to a female, I could keep a female chick from each cross and cross them back to their dads to establish the pattern?
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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Okay, so if I were to say get 3 males, (barred, laced and double laced) and bred them each to a female, I could keep a female chick from each cross and cross them back to their dads to establish the pattern?

Yes, that should work very well.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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Okay. And would it matter who I paired the partridge gal with? Or would she be fine with any of those three patterns?

I'd probably put the partridge hen with the double-laced rooster, and the black hen with the barred rooster, because they're already closer to those colors.

That would leave the white hen to go with the single laced rooster (first generation chicks might be all-white or might not, but crossing them back to the laced father should certainly give some colored ones.)
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
16,153
33,829
861
South-Eastern Montana
I'd probably put the partridge hen with the double-laced rooster, and the black hen with the barred rooster, because they're already closer to those colors.

That would leave the white hen to go with the single laced rooster (first generation chicks might be all-white or might not, but crossing them back to the laced father should certainly give some colored ones.)
Okay, thank you. The barred pair then would make all barred, ideally, correct since it's the opposite of a sexlink pair?
 

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