introducing new chickens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by heidiinak, May 23, 2011.

  1. heidiinak

    heidiinak Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 21, 2011
    Hi. I recently acquired 4 young hens and I was just wondering how long I should expect it take for them to be completely accepted by my older hens. The 4 "peepers" hang out together in their own little group right now. They each seem to take turns trying to join the others, only to get ran off by one or more of the older hens. My rooster seems to have accepted them from the beginning, so no problems there. Thanks for your time and advice. Have a nice day [​IMG]
     
  2. Inkheart

    Inkheart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 15, 2010
    Columbus Ohio
    I have to say it depends on the birds themselves. Some go faster and some well just never fit in . I had some that acted that way and hung out by themselves - only ten months later they are finally blending in - one of these hens to this day is a loner and goes and does her own things. No worries they will figure out their pecking order - may jsut take time
     
  3. glorianel5

    glorianel5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 7, 2010
    My question is similar. I now have 4 adults not quit a year old free ranging 3 Wyandottes 1 red.
    I want to introduce 5 little ones, they are between 5 and 7 weeks, 2 silkies, 1 black sex link, and 2 unknown at this time.
    How long should I wait to introduce the little ones to the ladies?
    How long before I know if the little ones are roosters or not?
    I have been told that the silkies will not let me know until one of the cockadoodle doos.
    Any thoughts would be helpful.

    Don't tell my husband about the 5 chicks, he thinks I have an illness.
    Thanks
    j
     
  4. carrlr

    carrlr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 31, 2010
    Southern Illinois
    I don't introduce new chickens until they are either quarantined for thirty days, or if newly hatched chicks until they are usually 8-10 weeks depending on their size. Once they've met those requirements, I usually have them placed in adjoining areas where they can see each other but can't get to each other. After a few days of this, I place those that will be joining the flock in my closed coop about an hour before roosting time. After they've gotten used to the coop and settled in for the night, and right before dark, I let the remaining chickens in. They generally settle right in for the night. On the next day, and just before dawn, I'll open the coop. It seems once they've slept together they seem to get along Ok. I time it so I can monitor it for at least a little while. They will generally establish a pecking order, but we haven't had any difficulties thus far. Oh, and I make sure I add a few more feeding/watering stations. Seem to keep everyone happy and fed.
     
  5. heidiinak

    heidiinak Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 21, 2011
    I got my little ones when they were 5 1/2 weeks old and I kept them in a dog kennel. I put the kennel with babies in with the other chickens for 24 hours so they could get used to the idea of something new in the coop. Then I let the little ones out with the others during the day but put locked them back in the kennel at night for 2 more nights. Now they are free to roam in the enclosure with all the other chickens and although they still stick together and haven't been "accepted in" by the adult chickens, they seem to be making themselves at home. I have left the dog kennel wide open in the coop and I have noticed that the 4 babies go in it at night to sleep all on their own so I plan on leaving it there for a while.
     

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