Introducing new chicks

Chickensinthecity

In the Brooder
Jul 29, 2019
15
32
44
Peekskill NY
I went through the search and found various opinions so wanted to ask for specific to my situation.
New to chickens, we have a self made coop and run made out of old child’s play house and swing set. Our girls are doing great varying in ages 5-7 weeks. There are 7 of them. We acquired 3 more chicks, ranging from 2-3 weeks old that have been inside under lights (PS do they need to be under lights if it’s warm in the room they are in?) when and how is the best time to introduce them to the big girls and have them in the coop? Big girls went in about 2 weeks ago. They’ve only met the little girls a couple times.....
 

slordaz

hatchaholic
5 Years
Apr 15, 2015
3,456
6,394
602
Idaho
heat no they don't need it, once feathers are in they will regulate their own heat change as needed , mine have just a little straw in the bottom of the coop during the winter when we get well below zero, The new ones need quarantined for at least 2 weeks best to do a month, then have them with a divider where they can see but not touch before working on introducing them together, that way they are aware of each other safely
 

Chickensinthecity

In the Brooder
Jul 29, 2019
15
32
44
Peekskill NY
even for my little girls that still are fuzzy? Sorry I should of been more clear on my question
heat no they don't need it, once feathers are in they will regulate their own heat change as needed , mine have just a little straw in the bottom of the coop during the winter when we get well below zero, The new ones need quarantined for at least 2 weeks best to do a month, then have them with a divider where they can see but not touch before working on introducing them together, that way they are aware of each other safely
Even for
 

slordaz

hatchaholic
5 Years
Apr 15, 2015
3,456
6,394
602
Idaho
even for my little girls that still are fuzzy? Sorry I should of been more clear on my question
Even for
Their baby feathers start coming in about 3-5 days once they are mostly got their feathers they do not need heat, my chicks hatching in warm weather only had heat enough to get them dried off and fluffed out for 1 day, then they hid from it liked it better just a regular 60 incandescent bulb for at night until they were mostly had feathers by 7-10 days old, you will notice if they are getting cold they huddle up, they did have a feather duster hung in their brooder, but by 2 weeks my chicks were out in the grow out pen, if they aren't babied so much they stay healthier and their body takes over as them little raptors have done fine without us meddling for a very long time
 

Chickensinthecity

In the Brooder
Jul 29, 2019
15
32
44
Peekskill NY
Totally makes sense. The sooner I get them out into gen pop the better for everyone lol
Their baby feathers start coming in about 3-5 days once they are mostly got their feathers they do not need heat, my chicks hatching in warm weather only had heat enough to get them dried off and fluffed out for 1 day, then they hid from it liked it better just a regular 60 incandescent bulb for at night until they were mostly had feathers by 7-10 days old, you will notice if they are getting cold they huddle up, they did have a feather duster hung in their brooder, but by 2 weeks my chicks were out in the grow out pen, if they aren't babied so much they stay healthier and their body takes over as them little raptors have done fine without us meddling for a very long time
Totally
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
11 Years
Nov 12, 2009
9,296
12,514
636
western South Dakota
You can tell by their peeping if they are too cold. Cold chicks peep madly and high pitched, when you warm them up, they will go to sleep. An occasional relaxed peep is fine.

It is helpful to say where you are from, and add the measurements of your coop and run. Weather, climate, and size of the set up can really influence advice.

Caution: New chicks are so tiny, you are not going to believe how big they will be in 4 short months. If I have the count right, you are up to 10 head. 10 head should have a 40 square foot coop, such as 4 x 10 feet, or 6 x 7 coop. And the run will need to be about 100 square feet - or 10 feet by 10. Often times what seems like an immense amount of space for chicks, rapidly becomes not enough space for full grown chickens.

I would put them out there sooner than later, make a safety zone in the set up in which they can be seen, but not thumped, and then lift it up from the ground, at a height the little ones can fit under, but a big bird can't fit.

Always add clutter to the run, hideouts, and roosts, and multiple feeders.

Mrs K
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
99,273
138,955
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
It is helpful to say where you are from, and add the measurements of your coop and run. Weather, climate, and size of the set up can really influence advice.
Yes, pics and dimensions please.

Depending on climate they may still need some heat at 2-3 weeks.
Better to have the heat and not need it, then not have it at all.
They also should be able to get away from the heat.

Here's how to add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, (laptop version shown), then it's always there!
upload_2019-8-22_7-42-30.png
 

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