Is framing needed for small coop

MadAngler

Songster
5 Years
Apr 14, 2014
85
26
104
My Coop
My Coop
Hello,
This is my first post.

I have 6 chicks that are about 1 week old. Now I'm working on building a coop...

I am thinking of 4' x 6' coop.

I have looked at nearly all the plans on backyardchickens. I've seen some coops that have full 2x4 framing like a house. But I've seen others like the "small coop tutorial" from the site and the book. That coop just used simple 2x2 framing on the corners.

So, what's the consensus? What sort of framing od you recommend for 4' by 6' coop?
 

thomasboyle

Songster
6 Years
Feb 28, 2013
933
297
176
Northwest Hills of CT
You didn't say where you live, and I would say the answer to your question depends on what predators you have around. 2x2 construction would be fine if you have small predators - raccoons, cats, small dogs etc. The issue with 2x2's is it is hard to drive more than 1 screw or nail into it without splitting it. I would go with 2x3 construction. Saves money over 2x4's, and is big enough to get 2 nails or screws per joint.

What are you going to cover the frame with? You'll want an inside area for the birds to sleep in and be protected in, and for the outside portion, I would recommend 1/2" hardware wire instead of chicken wire. Hardware wire is much stronger and better protection against predators.

Post pictures of your progress.
 

MadAngler

Songster
5 Years
Apr 14, 2014
85
26
104
My Coop
My Coop
thomas,

I live in Wisconsin. I think my primary predators will be dogs, coyotes, and racoons. Another "predator" may be snow load. I want the coop strong enough to support a fair bit of snow on the roof.

I was refering to the coop. So 4x6 will be the inside, covered area. I was planning on using T1-11 siding for the walls. The roof will be plywood and roofing panels.

I will also build a 6x6 run outside the coop (and I will put elevate the coop and allow them to have the 4x6 area under the coop too. So the entire run will be 6x10). The hardward cloth is a good idea. I had heard that chicken wire isn't really strong enoug

2x3's does sound like a nice compromise.
 

MadAngler

Songster
5 Years
Apr 14, 2014
85
26
104
My Coop
My Coop
Maybe I have my terms mixed up. I thought coop referred to the little building and run referred to the fenced enclosure. I probably should have asked if framing was needed for the hen house.
 

AtholCoop

Songster
11 Years
Sep 27, 2008
306
18
141
North Idaho
I've stretched the coop in the "Small coop tutorial" to as big as 4x8 on four different occasions (once as a crooked coop). 2x2 framing holds up just fine to everything the outside world throws at it including the winters where we get 10+ feet of snow.

If you think about it the coops primary weight load is the itself, food, water, and what ever mother nature chucks at it. The birds themselves weigh next to nothing.

I've probably built close to 20 of those coops as 4x4 and haven't had a call back on one of them yet.
 

Arielle

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 19, 2011
16,722
624
411
Massachusetts, USA
This is how we build--

2 x 2 works fine-- we rip 2 x 4's as needed and use scrap 1 by material too. THey coyote have not been a pr oblem and the raccoon cannot get in.

2 x 4 is what is used to build a house for humans and has a far larger load bearing ablility. A peak roof helps get the snow load off-- no flat roofs in snow country.
 

tcstoehr

Songster
5 Years
Mar 25, 2014
416
46
104
Canby, Oregon
I'd go 4'x8' if I were you. I just finished a 6'x10' and being a relative beginner at building things I discovered things work so much better in multiples of 4'. If you can manage, use the 2x4's instead of 2x2's. So much better for nails and screws to set into, and to hold onto siding. T-111 is plenty heavy and sturdy, and I personally would not frame that sort of heavy material with 2x2's. Or even LP siding, which is what I used. What ends up making the frame strong is actually the attached siding. So you want the siding attached quite firmly with solid anchor points.
If you do these things then when this job is finished, do you think you will look back and regret making it larger and with sturdier lumber? Or will you instead appreciate the added size and robustness?
 
Top Bottom