is my mini horse pregnant?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by lisa62479, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. lisa62479

    lisa62479 Out Of The Brooder

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    i bought a mini horse about a month ago from an auction. she was so sweet and nice. now she isnt so sweet. she kicks my 20 year old gelding :(.she kicks him everytime i feed them. my kids were washing her and found out she has alot of milk coming out. its not dripping but if u squeeze it, it shoots milk out alot. she is up to date on shots and dont want to call the vet out unless im sure...what do i do? how do i tell if she is pregnant? can u tell by pics?[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Could she just weaned her foal before coming to auction?

    If I really want to know if she is pregnant, I would get her checked out.
     
  3. lisa62479

    lisa62479 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 7, 2012
    thonotosassa, florida
    thats what i was thinking either a baby just got off her or she could be pregnant...do u know how long it takes for her to dry up? i will give it a couple more weeks to see if i think she is pregnant before i take her to the doctor...does anyone know any signs of pregnancy?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  4. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    With minis its tough to find a vet that would palpate the mares....if they carry the wand (used for detecting fetuses) or ultrasound machine, they will be able to tell if she is.

    I say a month will suffice for her to dry up. If your vet finds her not pregnant and she is still producing milk, (not infected), she may have going thru a "phantom pregnancy".

    Cute mare, reminds me of my own. Does she have papers?
     
  5. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Her built reminds me of Piney's Rain Beau....Piney's was a mini horse farm out in Florida.
     
  6. Epona142

    Epona142 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do NOT squeeze milk out. That's a good way to encourage her to continue making milk which invite mastitis and other issues.

    Have the vet come and check. It is impossible to tell if an animal if pregnant via pictures, unless there are feet poking out of the vulva.
     
  7. DuckyLou

    DuckyLou Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 29, 2012
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    To me, her bag looks like it is trying to dry up. One that is about to foal starts to look pretty full. Also the milk would look more of a golden color instead of white, because it would be colostrum. Most likely she had a foal already and it was weaned off before they took her to the sale. She would also be really showing by now if she was milking that much, and from the picture, she really doesn't appear to be in foal. Signs of foaling are a full bag, waxing of the teats, or dripping colostrum , Loose muscles on both sides close to her tail, and a loose vulva. I am 95% sure that she had a foal before you bought her. But I would keep a close eye on her anyway, since you really do not know.

    As far as the kicking goes, that is pretty normal during feeding time, esp with an alpha mare. She is just showing him who is boss. I like to separate mine during feeding time, so no one gets hurt, or has to fight for food.[​IMG]

    She is super cute, I LOVE minis, they are awesome!!!!
     
  8. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    As DuckyLou said, milk coming in does so with a full, round bag. Hers looks slack, so she's probably drying up. Also, as you no doubt have noticed, minis' figures frequently are on the, um, "fluffy" side, and your girl is no exception. If she were so far into a pregnancy that she was producing milk, she would be as wide as a bus!

    You can never tell a horse's personality by the way it behaves right after it is put in a new place. They are frequently very passive or extremely spooky when first introduced; their true nature surfaces after they have been there a while. People with lots of horse experience will tell you, mares are often at the top of the pecking order, even with stallions!
     

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