Is she broody?

Annalyse

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I need help. My silkie isnt even 1 year old yet so is she broody? She turns one in March 1st so, well yesterday she was in the coop from the morning to maybe 2 and I thought nothing of it because she came out. Well today shes been in the coop the ENTIRE day in the nesting box. She at night sleeps in the box so I usually pick her up and put her on the roost well I took the 2 eggs she was sitting on (1 is hers and 1 is not) well instead of standing up she just stayed in the same laying position and then I thought it was werid so I put her in the middle of the coop floor expecting her to stand up and nope just same laying position and sat there. I ended up putting her back in the box as shes warm there but is she broody? Should I keep an eye out for a while? What do I do? First time having a broody.
 

rosemarythyme

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Does she show any other signs of broodiness? Puffing up or flattening down or hissing at you when you reached for her, feather plucked belly, making a ticking sound like a bomb in a cartoon?

One other very obvious sign is spending the night in the nest but if you usually let her do that, can't use that as a gauge.
 

Annalyse

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Mar 24, 2020
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Does she show any other signs of broodiness? Puffing up or flattening down or hissing at you when you reached for her, feather plucked belly, making a ticking sound like a bomb in a cartoon?

One other very obvious sign is spending the night in the nest but if you usually let her do that, can't use that as a gauge.
She was puffed out and flattened even when I picked her up. She hissed at the other chickens not at me though. She let me take the eggs. Plucked belly? Idk about that one and no bomb nouse at least from what I thought. I did realize when I let them out this morning it was still dark out and she was the first to run out of the coop even though I remembered I put her up on the roost and she doesnt jump down that quick. So she might have jumped down during the night to go to the box.
 

rosemarythyme

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So sounds like she could be broody, and if that's the case, you need to decide if you want her to hatch or not (probably not advisable given that it's winter). Breaking her of broodiness promptly would be best for her health if you're not hatching.
 

Annalyse

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So sounds like she could be broody, and if that's the case, you need to decide if you want her to hatch or not (probably not advisable given that it's winter). Breaking her of broodiness promptly would be best for her health if you're not hatching.
Hears the thing I do have a rooster but she cant hatch any chicks bc he doesnt mate her. Shes the least favorite for him if you know what I'm trying to say. I collect the eggs everyday so it's not a problem for me. Should I just let her be? Will she eat and drink? Do i break her and if so how?
 

rosemarythyme

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Hears the thing I do have a rooster but she cant hatch any chicks bc he doesnt mate her. Shes the least favorite for him if you know what I'm trying to say. I collect the eggs everyday so it's not a problem for me. Should I just let her be? Will she eat and drink? Do i break her and if so how?

Even if she doesn't lay fertile eggs she can hatch eggs from your other hens.

You can let her sit out the brooding cycle but some hens don't want to break after sitting the normal duration, or if she's had any health issues, it would be a bad idea to let her set as she may not physically be in any condition to do so. It can also cause some strife in the flock as broodies can be moody or short tempered with the other birds.

Easiest way to break a broody:
Broody jail: Put her in an isolation cage with some food and water, in sight of the others (in the coop if it's not too hot or in/near the run is ideal). A wire cage elevated to air flow under her would be the best option, however I've used everything from a brooder to a dog exercise pen.

Keep her in the cage around the clock for about 2 days. At that time, if she's shows fewer signs of broodiness (puffing up, flattening down and growling, tik tik tik noise) you can let her out to test her. If she runs back to the nest at any point (usually they don't do it immediately, but maybe after 15 minutes, maybe an hour) then she's not yet sufficiently broken and needs to go back to the cage for another 24 hours. Then let her out and test her again. Repeat until she's no longer going to the nest box.

IF the isolation cage is not safe for overnight stay (i.e. sits outside the run) then put her on the roost at night, and retrieve her from the nest box the next morning and put her back in the cage. It may take a little longer this way but better than letting a predator get to her.
 

Annalyse

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Mar 24, 2020
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Even if she doesn't lay fertile eggs she can hatch eggs from your other hens.

You can let her sit out the brooding cycle but some hens don't want to break after sitting the normal duration, or if she's had any health issues, it would be a bad idea to let her set as she may not physically be in any condition to do so. It can also cause some strife in the flock as broodies can be moody or short tempered with the other birds.

Easiest way to break a broody:
Broody jail: Put her in an isolation cage with some food and water, in sight of the others (in the coop if it's not too hot or in/near the run is ideal). A wire cage elevated to air flow under her would be the best option, however I've used everything from a brooder to a dog exercise pen.

Keep her in the cage around the clock for about 2 days. At that time, if she's shows fewer signs of broodiness (puffing up, flattening down and growling, tik tik tik noise) you can let her out to test her. If she runs back to the nest at any point (usually they don't do it immediately, but maybe after 15 minutes, maybe an hour) then she's not yet sufficiently broken and needs to go back to the cage for another 24 hours. Then let her out and test her again. Repeat until she's no longer going to the nest box.

IF the isolation cage is not safe for overnight stay (i.e. sits outside the run) then put her on the roost at night, and retrieve her from the nest box the next morning and put her back in the cage. It may take a little longer this way but better than letting a predator get to her.
Is it okay if I take her out of the coop and place her in the fenced in area around the coop. She likes to be out of the chicken coop and run and if shes distracted with grass would shebe okay and then I'll out her back in after a while? I can definently put her on the roost at night.
 

rosemarythyme

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Is it okay if I take her out of the coop and place her in the fenced in area around the coop. She likes to be out of the chicken coop and run and if shes distracted with grass would shebe okay and then I'll out her back in after a while? I can definently put her on the roost at night.

Do you have other hens which are currently laying? The usual issue is, how to give them nest access while keeping the broody out. So caging them solves that, and also prevents them from trying to set somewhere else.

Some people do break broodies by going out frequently and kicking them off the nest, but it takes longer and can be less reliable depending on how frequently you can go out there.
 

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