itsbrittanypearl

Chirping
Apr 7, 2020
11
38
64
Houston, Texas
I am still kind of new to the chicken world. My first and my little baby girl Nugget (profile picture) has not pooped in awhile. Lost a lot of weight, lethargic, and it keeps getting worse as the weeks go on. I’ve kept her separate from the other chickens in my flock for two days now and when I went to check on her tonight, she finally pooped. It was black, tarry, and smelled so bad to the point I gagged some. Note: I have started treating her for worms as of yesterday with diatanacious earth food grade and giving her vitamin water. When I put her in the tub to rinse her off, I took these pictures of her poo that confirm roundworms. Even in the smallest bits, there was a lot of worms. Is this significant of an infection curable? She can’t even support herself or even lay down normally anymore.
 

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Aapomp831

Crowing
Oct 4, 2017
3,670
6,217
481
Lincolnton, NC
Those are roundworms and DE does not prevent or treat worms. You need either ivermectin or safeguard liquid goat dewormer to take care of that. I would do this immediately; once worms start coming out of the poop it means there is a serious infestation since worms would rather be inside.
 

getaclue

Enabler
9 Years
Jun 19, 2013
11,788
38,622
1,172
Central Florida
DE will NOT worm chickens. VALBAZEN Dosage is 1/2cc for standard size (6 lbs. ) chickens and 1/4cc for smaller (bantams) chickens. I highly recommend that you worm ALL your chickens with valbazen. You must redose them again in 10 days after the initial worming to kill larva hatched from eggs after the initial dosing. Dont eat the eggs for 21 days.
See the elevated hole in the center of the throat? You do NOT want to get any liquid in there, since that's their airway for breathing. Keep the dosage syringe to the right side of the mouth (facing chicken) with their head held upward. Dispense some liquid, then let go so they can swallow. Repeat until they've received the whole dose.
Yes, it's a bit intimidating to do your very first time, and you'll be a bit nervous. Take your time. By the time you get a few of them done, you'll be an old pro at it.
5533562.jpg
 
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Swbertrand1

Crowing
Apr 21, 2018
1,130
1,550
271
Wilmington, NC
See the elevated hole in the center of the throat? You do NOT want to get any liquid in there, since that's their airway for breathing. Keep the dosage syringe to the right side of the mouth (facing chicken) with their head held upward. Dispense some liquid, then let go so they can swallow. Repeat until they've received the whole dose.
Yes, it's a bit intimidating to do your very first time, and you'll be a bit nervous. Take your time. By the time you get a few of them done, you'll be an old pro at it.
View attachment 2756514

EXCELLENT photo of how to properly administer liquids to a chicken! We found a similar photo via research to be sure we don't aspirate our birds when giving meds.
Knowledge of chicken anatomy is an important aspect of keeping these feathered friends... :)
 

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