Is this good for insulation of the inside of my coop?

3KillerBs

Crowing
Jul 10, 2009
2,847
5,037
456
North Carolina Sandhills
IMO, they would collect all kinds of dirt and dust and provide a haven for both insect and rodent pests.

Why do you want insulation?

As a general rule, the excellent ventilation required for chicken health makes insulation moot -- though it is advisable for metal walls and roofs in order to prevent condensation from collecting and dripping onto the chickens and into their bedding.

If you put your general location into your profile it would make it easier for people to give good advice targeted to your climate. :)
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,058
106,800
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
Using that fine blanket in a chicken coop would be a shame,
I'd like to have one of those on my bed!

You're intro says you're in NJ....no need for insulation there.
If you post pics of your coop we can help you get it ready for winter.

Oh, and.... Welcome to BYC! @Dhkoenig
Here's how to add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1603208864189.png
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Feb 2, 2009
26,165
16,928
797
Southeast Louisiana
I'll include a link to an article by someone that keeps chickens in much colder temperatures than you will see. It might make you feel more comfortable with what you have, plus it's a good time of the year in the northern hemisphere to put this article out there.

Alaskan’s Article

https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/cold-weather-poultry-housing-and-care.72010/

Your job is not to keep the chickens warm. Your job is to allow your chickens to keep themselves warm with their down coat. That generally means to keep breezes from hitting them and provide adequate ventilation so the moisture from their breath, their poop, and any open water containers can get out. In some situations insulation can help, but probably not that much in your situation.

If you have a metal roof proper roof insulation can keep condensation from raining down in your coop. Those blankets are not the proper insulation for that. If your nest is exposed (some people hang them outside the coop) good insulation may slow down the egg from freezing. In colder climates than yours there could be some benefits in insulating the coop but probably not in your climate.
 

Dhkoenig

Chirping
Sep 21, 2020
67
55
50
Bergen County New Jersey
Using that fine blanket in a chicken coop would be a shame,
I'd like to have one of those on my bed!

You're intro says you're in NJ....no need for insulation there.
If you post pics of your coop we can help you get it ready for winter.

Oh, and.... Welcome to BYC! @Dhkoenig
Here's how to add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2380168
Thank you so much! I just changed my settings for that and will check out the article on ventilation!
 

Dhkoenig

Chirping
Sep 21, 2020
67
55
50
Bergen County New Jersey
Here is my coop - the windows open and have screens but during winter cold (20 and below) I wouldn't want those open - too drafty, so the other ventilation I have is shown here, the louvered vents and the 1 inch holes at eves. If this is not enough, how can I make more for winter without drafts or ruining my brand new coop?
 

Attachments

Callender Girl

Crowing
Sep 18, 2018
1,479
7,748
466
North Central Iowa
It's hard not to worry about keeping your birds warm during the winter. I have a coop that's built very similarly to yours, and even in flat, windy, frigid northern Iowa, my chickens are fine in the winter.

Although I wish mine had more ventilation, until it is absolutely ridiculously frigid, I leave the screen open on one of the two side windows; the girls all like to roost on the south end of the coop, so I partially open the window on the north end. A nearby, taller coop blocks most of the wind that way, so they get air but not knock-them-off-the-roost wind. Although not original to my coop, there is hardware cloth attached over those windows so predators don't stop by for meals.

It's not ideal because I would rather the ventilation was above their heads, but I don't trust that the built-in vents bring in enough air. The good news is that for the past two years, everybody who has lived in that coop has successfully survived winter.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom