Just need some information

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by LouLou44, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. LouLou44

    LouLou44 Chirping

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    My hen has been sitting her her 10-11 eggs for 4 days now, I heard they will hatch between 20-23 days. Is that correct.? And when they hatch should I remove them and bring them in? I am new to everything.. help lol
     
  2. PachecoPeeps

    PachecoPeeps Songster

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    Yes it usually takes 21 days for eggs to hatch unless you have a staggered hatch. Did you mark your eggs?

    Has your hen raised chicks before? If all goes well she should raise them with very little help from you but it’s a good idea to have a brooder ready in case she is a bad mom and you need to save the chicks from her. Once hatched it is also okay for her to eat the chick feed. Don’t have layer feed out because she won’t need it and it can kill the chicks.

    Some people also like to keep the broody hen in a separate area of the coop and create a kind of room for them and the chicks.
     
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  3. LouLou44

    LouLou44 Chirping

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    No I didn’t mark my eggs :/ and I have no idea if she’s raised any before. I only have one hen and rooster, should I separate the rooster out? All I did was write on my calendar every time I had a new egg.
     
  4. PachecoPeeps

    PachecoPeeps Songster

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    Just be prepared because some eggs may not hatch. Hens usually only sit for about 48 hours once the chicks start hatching and then after that they get up and take the chicks out for food,water, etc
     
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  5. LouLou44

    LouLou44 Chirping

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    Should I remove the rooster at any point?
     
  6. Country_Boy

    Country_Boy In the Brooder

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    I've heard it's best to have 1 Roo with 4-6 hens. With that ratio the Roo's instinct to mate with a hen isn't disrupted and the broody hen (who has by now stopped laying and will not lay again until the chicks have left her side) isn't pestered by the Roo. In your case, well he'll just have to wait for her to start sending signals again cause she will protect them from anything, including him! I'd only take action if the Roo acts aggressively towards them. Good luck!
     
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  7. debid

    debid Crowing

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    I'd leave him in as long as he behaves himself. That prevents him from having to be introduced to the chicks later. It can be especially treacherous for young cockerels to be added in where there is already a hen shortage. I'd have something ready to separate him immediately in case he loses patience with the hen brooding or is aggressive to the newly hatched chicks. Roosters should leave them be but you have two inexperienced chickens and without a flock to guide them so :idunno
     
  8. debid

    debid Crowing

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    Marking eggs is important if there are other hens that could be adding eggs to the nest. Don't worry about that, your broody should not be laying. Of course, if she IS still laying, she isn't broody, she's hiding from the rooster.
     
    LouLou44 likes this.
  9. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    A good roo will actually help with the chicks. Each situation is different. If you have eggs that were added to the clutch after the hen started setting, you may end up with a staggered hatch. The hen will take the early chicks off the nest and abandon the rest. If you want to save them all, you will need an incubator.

    Even though you are not incubating those eggs, I suggest that you go to the learning center and start reading: "Hatching eggs 101" will have some articles about embryo development, how to candle an egg, how to do an assisted hatch (you should not need to do so, but having the knowledge will prepare you for any situation). There are also articles about managing the broody hen, and incubation. Also, read @Blooie 's articles about MHP, so you will be prepared if the hen hatches her eggs, but abandons the chicks.

    No, you should not remove the chicks from her, unless she attacks them. She may give them an occasional rap on the head. That's hen speak for "Hey you little twit, listen to me when I tell you to do something."

    You might also want to dust her nest with permethrin. A sitting hen is a target for mites and lice.

    Do not provide any supplemental heat. Mama will take care of all the chick needs including feeding them and keeping them appropriately warm.
     
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