Laying Question

Fluffy1128

In the Brooder
Aug 25, 2019
2
1
11
Mountain View, AR
I am new to raising chickens and have a question. I have 6 silver laced Wyandotte hens, they are all 21 weeks old. 1 has been laying for a week now, but nothing out of the other 5. Is this normal? Am I doing something wrong or do I just need to be patient? They are eating well (layer crumbles) and are in an enclosed run so I know they’re not laying somewhere else. Thanks in advance
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,342
19,946
832
California's Redwood Coast
Hi there, welcome to BYC! :frow

Completely normal for birds of the same age and breed to mature and start laying at different ages. All are individuals.

One example... I had 3 Rocks. They started laying at 20, 22, and 24 weeks.

I would say you do just need to be patient. :)

Though I personally don't prefer "layer" feed for dual purpose birds such as Wyandotte and consider 16% protein to be the minimum to keep a light bodies layer like leghorn in laying condition. DP birds will do best on at least 18% protein. And 22% was shown to give the best hatch rates which to me says more nutrition in the eggs my family is eating. So I like to use a 20% protein flock raiser and offer oyster shell free choice on the side for those who are actively laying.

Just be sure not to offer too much scratch or other low nutrient/high energy treats that diminish the protein, amino acid, vitamin and mineral content of your layer feed in order to avoid lots of *possible* issues.

And congrats on your first eggs! :wee
 

tripletfeb

Crowing
Jun 9, 2018
1,882
7,868
456
The little farm, northern Ohio
Welcome to BYC! As said before, its perfectly normal to have different chickens of the same breed lay at different times. I have 3 Silver Laced, just like you. Mine started laying months apart from each other! And I do know that feeding an all flock feed is popular on here, I don't personally trust my ladies to eat the oyster shell when they need it. So I feed mine Purina Layer Pellets, with Omega 3 added and offer oyster shell on the side. I figure I can always supplement the protein in the form of mealworms or other sources. I want to make sure my girls are getting enough calcium. Congrats on the first egg and Im sure the other ones will be joining in soon!
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,342
19,946
832
California's Redwood Coast
I figure I can always supplement the protein in the form of mealworms or other sources. I want to make sure my girls are getting enough calcium.
Just beware that meal worm and many of the popular things like eggs are VERY high in fat... Eggs are 34%protein but 64% fat with half the protein being in the yolk. And here is a link showing nutrition of meal worms being 40% fat...
http://www.sialis.org/raisingmealworms.htm#freeze

There are surely other sources of lower fat protein though that are acceptable as well. Balance is key. :)

The birds not eating the OS is a valid concern. I keep mine next to the coop door and near the feeding stations. I've raised hundreds of birds and only have an issue with soft shells when it's a new layer (or returning layer from molt or brooding) hiccup of the reproductive system coming online and working out it's kinks... A hen will sacrifice the calcium from her own body before laying softees.
 

50-45-1

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Feb 25, 2008
2,714
8,666
626
Northern Michigan (tip of the little finger area)
My Coop
My Coop
How are you sure it is the one hen laying an egg a day.
I think it would be strange for a new layer to go from 0 to an egg a day at first. First eggs are sometime small or misshapen. They sometimes take the hen by suprise and she lays them in the yard or under the perches. There is usually an adjustment period and first eggs are sparordic and skipped days are the norm.
I think if you are getting an egg a day you have at least 3 girls laying.
Look at combs, the bright red ones are laying.
Congratulations!
 
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slordaz

hatchaholic
5 Years
Apr 15, 2015
3,456
6,393
602
Idaho
Welcome to BYC, eggciting time ahead as they make ya wait, then some of them have kinks to work out, but each hen is an individual and on her own schedule even if they are from same hatch, they lay usually between 4-6 months, with a few exceptions breeds that don't normally lay until 9-12 months
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
97,977
134,831
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
I am new to raising chickens and have a question. I have 6 silver laced Wyandotte hens, they are all 21 weeks old. 1 has been laying for a week now, but nothing out of the other 5. Is this normal? Am I doing something wrong or do I just need to be patient? They are eating well (layer crumbles) and are in an enclosed run so I know they’re not laying somewhere else. Thanks in advance
How long have you been feeding layer?
Can you post pics of birds?
This time of year, when the days are getting exponentially shorter(if you live in the northern hemisphere) can stall things a bit.
Here's some tips on how to tell....
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/who-is-laying-and-who-is-not-butt-check.73309/

Oh, and....Welcome to BYC! @Fluffy1128
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, (laptop version shown), then it's always there!
upload_2019-8-29_8-47-6.png
 

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