Looking to get an idea of the interest?

onehorse

In the Brooder
9 Years
Mar 7, 2010
19
0
32
We are interested in importing Orpingtons hatching eggs from the UK, looking to expand our flock and colors, plus I like how much "fluffier" the UK Orps look, but the cost is looking a bit prohibitive. Would anyone else be interested in sharing costs? I am not sure of all the logistics, but there will probably be some limiting factors, but my hope is to be able to get eggs from most/all of the Orpington colors and enough eggs to get some decent stock out of the transaction. I would like to here anyone's experiences on importing from the UK.
 

ranchhand

Rest in Peace 1956-2011
11 Years
Aug 25, 2008
13,295
78
291
SC
welcome-byc.gif
first!

I would be very concerned about the USDA regulations and permits. Not only very restrictive, but with security right now, extra restrictive.

There are several BYC members from the UK, hopefully they will be able to tell you more about their breed standards.
 

onehorse

In the Brooder
9 Years
Mar 7, 2010
19
0
32
From everything that I have seen and everything that everyone has said, importing from the UK is not an issue, the issues come from finding someone that will deal with the DEFRA requirements, USDA are actually pretty easy, just expensive, and covering the costs, looking at roughly $800++ to ship in hatching eggs with the normal hatch rate promise as on all hatching eggs.
 

Penturner

Songster
9 Years
Feb 1, 2010
889
14
131
Reno Nevada
I have never imported anything living so I am not sure what details would change in regard to that. But I have never had anything clear customs unless than 3 days and more often it is closer to two weeks. I know things can happen much faster if you have an agent and everything has been taken care of in advance. any problems and you can kiss your eggs good bye. I usually expect an agent to cost between $100 and $150. I am able to get shipments from China to my door in 3 days. I pay about $500 for 100 lbs of freight. it comes to either LA or San Francisco as the port of entry. this is when an agent can really save you. they will go get the package and settle any problems on the spot. they then notify you of any additional costs etc but have already taken possession of your eggs. you get them paid and they will do whatever it takes to get those eggs to you in time. the trick is to get your eggs out of the possession of customs asap and back into the hands of someone that cares they are fragile. any hic ups with customs and it is game over. they will not care fore hatching eggs. they would probably care for chicks but I seriously doubt they are even equipped for eggs. having as much stuff resolved before they ship would help.
 

onehorse

In the Brooder
9 Years
Mar 7, 2010
19
0
32
LOL, believe me there is a laundry list and Chocolate is a definite! The little guys are easier to find then the bigger ones, but apparently they are out there. Finding people on the other side of the pond that are willing to ship has been a devil too. I don't have a problem arranging it, had someone else show the importance of an agent and would be working, probably, with FedEx for the import. Talked with the USDA and it doesn't sound bad for this side of things, but my contact on the other side didn't get back to me. Not a good sign? Any other interest, anyone willing to let me borrow incubators? USDA will allow me to ship in as many eggs as I can fit.
 

Katy

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Jun 29, 2007
16,317
87
331
Kansas~50+ yrs of chickens
If I was going to go to the time and expense of importing (it would be jubilee orps and wyandottes) I would get birds, not eggs.

I would be interested in what the USDA told you as far as paperwork involved on both ends as well as expense.
 

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