Low ,medium And High Humidity Test On Quail Eggs

jm93030

Songster
10 Years
Jun 4, 2009
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5
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I found this site about the result of incubation in 3 diferent humidity levels

I thought it was interesting and wanted to share with you guys

http://www.lrrd.org/lrrd21/3/roma21038.htm

Abstract
This research aimed to verify the effect of relative humidity during incubation of Japanese quail eggs on hatchability, egg weight loss, hatch weight, and embryo mortality. A total of 150 Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica) were used for egg collections. The eggs were divided into three experimental groups: low humidity group (36.05±6.06% RH; n=100), intermediate humidity group (52.25±4.99% RH; n=100) and high humidity group (76.50±4.44% RH; n=100). Each group of eggs was incubated in an individual incubator, according to its experimental relative humidity during incubation. Incubation process was done by automatic incubators with temperature of 37.5°C, and egg turning every 30 minutes. At the 15th day of incubation (360h) egg turning was stopped and the eggs were transferred to the hatcher that maintained the same temperature and relative humidity until hatch. All eggs were weighted on 1st, 5th, 10th, and 15th day of incubation and quail chicks at hatch.



Japanese quail eggs incubated at the lower humidity presented the highest level of hatchability (79%) compared to intermediate and high humidities. Egg weight loss was respectively 11.96%, 8.94%, and 4.89% for low, intermediate and high humidity groups. Futhemore, the weight at hatch was influenced by the different incubational humidities. Embryo mortality presented no statistical difference among the different humidity treatments.

Key-words: Coturnix japonica, egg weight loss, embryo mortality, hatch weight, hatchability


Introduction
Japanese quail raising is an important poultry business in Brazil. The quails have been reared for both egg and meat production all over the country, mainly by small and medium breeders. Incubation procedures are important to maintenance and improvement of quail egg production in Brazil, which is increasing over the last years. One of the key points of incubation is the humidity control of incubators to allow a successful incubation performance.



Water accounts for 68.25% of total eggs mass before incubation (Martin and Arnold 1991). The amount of moisture lost from the eggs during incubation can affect hatchability (Lundy 1969) and chick weight (Burton and Tullett 1985).



During incubation, a certain amount of water must be around the embryos to protect them from drying out at an early stage of development (Yoshizaki and Saito 2002). Conversely, at a late stage of development, the drying of embryos is necessary to initiate air breathing (Bainter and Fehér 1974).



Usually 12 to 14% of water is lost during incubation of broiler and turkey eggs (Rahn et al 1981). Too low or too high water loss influences embryo development (Rahn and Ar 1974), and, consequently, egg hatchability (Meir et al 1984). The rate of water loss from eggs during incubation can be regulated through changes in incubator relative humidity (Peebles et al 1987; Tullett 1990).



The temperature can highly influence the relative humidity, and both contribute to water loss during incubation, this way temperature and humidity must be carefully monitored during incubation, because the embryo is not able to control the water loss of egg (Ar 1991).



The relationship between temperature and relative humidity was studied and standardized for duck (Cheng et al 2005), turkey (Applegate et al 1999) and broiler incubation (Van Brecht et al 2003), even though it was not sufficiently studied this relationship on Japanese quail incubation.



The objective of this research was verifying the effect of relative humidity during incubation of Japanese quail eggs on hatchability, egg weight loss, hatch weight, and embryo mortality.
 
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joe125

Songster
9 Years
Sep 20, 2010
1,163
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Well, you can dry hatch your game birds all you want. If your hatching model becomes network standard, then bully for you!

I'll stick with my 45-55% for incubation, then 55% to infinity for hatching coturnix.
 

aprophet

Songster
10 Years
Jan 12, 2010
3,798
32
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chesapeake Va.
Quote:Doing hatching this way with non shipped eggs I average 85-95 % hatch rate this is the ones that make it to lock down what ain,t broke I rarely try to fix
 

joe125

Songster
9 Years
Sep 20, 2010
1,163
10
131
The temperature can highly influence the relative humidity, and both contribute to water loss during incubation

Really? Really?
The temperature can highly influence the relative humidity? No poop Sherlock!
This is why ignorant people say "Reduce the temp by one deg. for hatch". That increases the humidity by about 10%....Remember..."the temperature can highly influence the relative humidity".
See how that works together?

Well, screw me running...I never thunked of it that way....you mean, temp and humidity have some sort of scientifically definable parameters?

YES WE DO JOE! Thanks temp and humidity! YOU'RE WELCOME JOE!​
 

Chikndinner

Chirping
9 Years
Sep 9, 2010
132
2
99
Quote:Really? Really?
The temperature can highly influence the relative humidity? No poop Sherlock!
This is why ignorant people say "Reduce the temp by one deg. for hatch". That increases the humidity by about 10%....Remember..."the temperature can highly influence the relative humidity".
See how that works together?

Well, screw me running...I never thunked of it that way....you mean, temp and humidity have some sort of scientifically definable parameters?

YES WE DO JOE! Thanks temp and humidity! YOU'RE WELCOME JOE!

As a visitor to this forum I must say......you sound really rude. Got a sensitive bone?
 

joe125

Songster
9 Years
Sep 20, 2010
1,163
10
131
Quote:Really? Really?
The temperature can highly influence the relative humidity? No poop Sherlock!
This is why ignorant people say "Reduce the temp by one deg. for hatch". That increases the humidity by about 10%....Remember..."the temperature can highly influence the relative humidity".
See how that works together?

Well, screw me running...I never thunked of it that way....you mean, temp and humidity have some sort of scientifically definable parameters?

YES WE DO JOE! Thanks temp and humidity! YOU'RE WELCOME JOE!

As a visitor to this forum I must say......you sound really rude. Got a sensitive bone?

Unless I'm wrong, I was poking fun at a publication. Not anyone in the forum. A publication that was put together from others data, I may point out. If anyone was personally offended .. I apologize!

The fact of the matter is...Incubating eggs of any kind contains way to many variables for the average person to account for in the same way all the "Scientific studies" can. Temp and humidity are constants, and can be controlled by lowering/raising the heat, increasing/decreasing the surface area of water, and increasing/decreasing air exchange in an empty bator. Those are constants, and can be scientifically controlled with little effort.
Throw in 6 genie eggs, 12 bobwhites, 10 coturnix, 8 Zambian gutter snipes, and the variables go wicked crazy!
As long as people know how to control the constants, they can then adapt to the variables.

Actually I have more than one sensitive bone. The main one want's everyone in the world to have a good hatch! This is why I try to give anyone hatching coturnix, the best advice I can. I'll see you that sensitive bone, and raise you a sense of humor bone. I think I can live fine without them both.

You can also have my...visit other forums and beat people up bone as well. I never use that one anyway.

I hope we become great friends!
 

joe125

Songster
9 Years
Sep 20, 2010
1,163
10
131
Quote:Doing hatching this way with non shipped eggs I average 85-95 % hatch rate this is the ones that make it to lock down what ain,t broke I rarely try to fix


Me too, but we have to be "sensitive"!
Actually, anyone I know that raises game birds uses this formula.
 

Chikndinner

Chirping
9 Years
Sep 9, 2010
132
2
99
I'll see your humor bone.

I just had no idea of your perspective on the information offerred.

That's the trouble with printed words on the internet. You can't see the person to be able to read between the lines;) No personal offense here.

anyway.... Carry on
 

_Randall_

Songster
10 Years
Nov 3, 2009
1,085
10
151
Grenada, Ms
Quote:What does 55 to infinity mean? Are you saying 55% should be the low and it can be anything up to 100% for hatching?

Sorta Kinda............100% would almost be shy of a little rain shower happening in the bator. I've had good hatches with 85% - 90%.......but IF you could get 95%+, I don't think it would hurt, that is the last 3 days. See "Hatching" on page 3 of this manual, as well as the chart on page 5: https://www.gqfmfg.com/pdf/Cabinet Model Instructions.pdf
 
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