Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder (Picture Heavy) - UPDATE

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Blooie, Mar 4, 2015.

  1. Fire Ant Farm

    Fire Ant Farm Get off my lawn Premium Member

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    What's interesting about this question is that here in South Texas, there's this sort of weird temperature vs. day length conflict. It is so hot as to be stressful to the birds until October (indeed, standard practice is not to even consider raising meaties until mid October here), and temperatures are relatively mild (compared to yours, for the temps you noted) all winter. Fall/winter is easier on all the birds and yields any more luscious greens for foraging. So our seasons is weirdly reversed. What doesn't match is the day length though, which complicates things...

    (It's also why growing onions is more complicated as well!!!)

    - Ant Farm
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2015
  2. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    I have the same or similar climate, though probably drier than yours. IF I were to raise up some meaties it would be in those cooler months. I do get about 72 hours worth of snow in the winter but Most of the winter is very dry and Windy. So my focus in building animal structures is Windbreak and Shade.

    I am planning on a broody place but am also going to build a brooder in the poultry house.

    deb
     
  3. Fire Ant Farm

    Fire Ant Farm Get off my lawn Premium Member

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    Oh, yeah. Shade. It's ALL about shade...

    - Ant Farm
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    Even in tundra land, it makes more sense if growing CXR to start them in August. Little if any heat needed, they can be tractored or penned outside, and processed in cooler weather. Nothing worse than processing birds when the flies and the yellow jackets find your work station. Sad thing is, I don't think that feed stores even have chicks available in August! Aside from hawk issues, my broody hatched chicks did great (hatch date 8/9).
     
  5. bruceha2000

    bruceha2000 Chicken Obsessed

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    That is quite reasonable. I was asking questions on the Cubalaya forum when I got my 2 three years ago. One in Texas said his birds laid in the winter, not so much in the summer. Well, not here in Vermont! But they are Cuban birds developed from game fowl, makes sense they would not lay in high heat periods. I'm sure my summer temps are a lot closer to his winter temps.
     
  6. A V Davidson

    A V Davidson Out Of The Brooder

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    Maricopa, AZ
    Okay...I don't want to get fined or go to jail so here is a photo. You cannot see much of what I discussed in my last post. The temp water bottle is hung on the kennel cage door. The heating pad is tucked under the 2x4 "roost" I constructed for just that and to give them their own selection of how much heat they want. Newest, littlest chick is in the foreground (adopted today).

    We went to the feed store today and they had just acquired a big batch of week-old peepers. I could use a bit of help if any of you can see in the photo good enough to tell me...what is this breed I just brought home with me? The clunk at the store, I mean clerk, didn't know any of the five breeds he had in stock...I just reached in a grabbed one that didn't look like mine at home. What I'm hoping you'll say is RIR, Maran, or White Leghorn; or I'll find out when she grows a little bigger. Her wing feathers were a row of small and a final row of long...hopefully a hen. The older chicks (6 weeks) don't seem to care to bother her and at all for which I'm very fortunate.

    The older chicks have been spending the sunny hours outside in the cage/hut I built for them. The hut rests above the run cage and they haven't yet discovered how to get from upper to lower levels on the ramp. I still have a little more work to do on it including the water nipples. So far everything has gone well and the girls appear to be in the best of health.

    I'm not sure, but I think it's about time they should be transitioning from starter feed (powdery) to the next step. I have been grinding wheat grain, rolled oats, O.Reddenbacher popcorn, egg shells, pumpkin and squash seeds in my Bullet grinder. The grains crack down to about 1/4 their full size and there is some that gets powdered. I'm certainly no expert on chicken feed, but I have felt this to possibly be good for them. I haven't come upon any ideas for drying and grinding up carnivorous treats to add that type of protein to their feed. Maybe some of you can help me get educated with this. I'm growing alfalfa, oats, peas, barley, and a few other grains so they'll have some fresh sprouts to scratch through in a couple of months.

    When we get to our Summer cabin there will be thousands of grasshoppers for them to digest, and other insects. Our German Shepherd already does a pretty decent job of protecting them when they are out of their cages, so random foraging should be abundant for them.

    If there is anything you see or read here please let me know quickly so I can remedy the problem and keep them healthy. Thanks


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    Well, I just took this photo about 10 minutes ago. Hope it posts well.

    frogstomper
     
  7. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    That chick looks like a little red sex link pullet.
     
  8. A V Davidson

    A V Davidson Out Of The Brooder

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    HI, Beekissed.......

    I'm not at all sure what "sex link" pullet means. Because you also used the words "little red" I might make the assumption that your are possibly referring to a RIR or perhaps a Hampshire Red...either would be very acceptable in my "herd". Thanks for the post reply. Also it could mean a "mix breed" (half breed).

    Frogstomper


    PS ...and YES, I included a few photos with this post. These are their outdoor accommodations except that the Kerr bottle feeder and waterer are not permanent. You see the very well built and practical Wise feeder to the left. This morning I filled it with scratch feed, and sprinkled some of the feed over the ground. They preferred pecking off the ground and learning how to scratch. They stay outside now from about 10AM to 5PM. I'm happy that they are happy.

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    This little guy likes baby chicks, too.

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  9. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Nope, not RIR or New Hampshire....a red sex link is a combination of layer breeds, one of which is red, that produces chicks that are born with a certain color for each sex, hence the name "sex link". The red sex link birds are considered production layers and the pullets are red, with the males of that breed cross coming out white with red feathering in patches or areas, while the pullets are normally red with small feathers of white or black here and there, usually at tail and wing tips, depending upon the cross made to produce them.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_link
     
  10. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    Sorry, haven't been on much...went out of town for the weekend.

    Red Sex Links are awesome chickens, too, I think! I really like mine. Great layers, not demanding, run sort of in the middle of the pecking order here at Oleo Acres (although some folks have reported differently) and a good ratio of egg production to feed. My Brahmas, which I also like a lot, eat much more than I'll ever see out of them for eggs!

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    Sweet Little Ida, front, and Beatrice, back, when they were about 6 months old. Very happy with these Red Sex Links.

    And thanks for posting the photos!! Your membership is secure! [​IMG]
     

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