Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder (Picture Heavy) - UPDATE

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Blooie, Mar 4, 2015.

  1. Spinning Carrie

    Spinning Carrie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They actually do it by lot size, which I like. For every 1600 square feet you have in your lot, you may have one fowl (no roosters though). Mine ended up at 7.35 and the city zoning employee was very specific in saying they round down. I don't think they've learned chicken math!

    Thanks! My Grandpa used to raise sheep, he liked to say, "I'll be darned if those sheep don't start looking for a way to die as soon as they're born." Chicks seem much the same way!

    I like sixth graders. They have a fun sense of humor, and I don't have to tie any shoes or do any buttons or zippers! I will say that in the spring there starts to be a smell and the hormones really get going and I can't wait for the last day of school to come. [​IMG]

    Carrie
     
  2. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    Yep.....the only chicken out of all of those out there that ever goes broody is Agatha, also known as Attila the Hen when she's sitting on eggs. But not counting on her this time around. It's weird - she sits tight, textbook broody - and when Scout hatched she was a really good mommy. I don't know if it's the luck of the draw that she has rotten hatches or what. I'm not messing with these eggs!
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  4. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 True BYC Addict

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    That's actually very interesting and a very cool way to do it!

    I do agree with aart though, that's probably why they were specific. :p
     
  5. bruceha2000

    bruceha2000 Chicken Obsessed

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    So I'm curious who the old providers are (that they severed ties with) and who the new ones are. Not that I will be hatching any eggs, I'm just curious [​IMG]

    And you have the coop all built right? If not, start YESTERDAY! Amazing how fast those little fluffballs grow.

    The MOST important thing about the HP is that it NOT turn itself off. If the pad you got does not have that feature - DO NOT USE IT (unless you want to be present to turn it back on every 2 hours around the clock)!
     
  6. Spinning Carrie

    Spinning Carrie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We went out yesterday and got the first load of lumber, so we have a start!

    Carrie
     
  7. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

     
  8. chonsey

    chonsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is a sunbeam, S85A-will test before setting it out there. My husband has me using a light also. With Michigan winters you have to have plan A & B. I have an old horse stall I'll be using. So they can gather under the light, (water&food will be stationed under light) and if they want they can huddle under the heating pad. We just had a large coyote come through yesterday, so my chicks will be kept in the barn until spring.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2016
  9. BeachyChicken

    BeachyChicken Out Of The Brooder

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    I used the heating pad method for my first small flock of 7. I loved many aspects of it, especially that it does seem like a much better and more natural way for them to experience the rhythm of day and night. I have to admit though, that using this method did give me a fair dose of anxiety as it was a DIY job and not "official"...but in retrospect I am so happy I went for it! Thank you for all your advise!! My chicks are now around 9 weeks old and all doing amazingly well. Here is Southwest Florida they stopped using it around 5 weeks and were happy to move to their big coop/run! Anyway, I just wanted to say thank you for supporting an original idea and helping us all learn!
     
  10. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    Oh, I know that "insecure about it in the beginning" feeling so well! How can this work? They can't be warm enough! Am I going to kill them all? I had used this for the very first time with Scout after his injury, but he was in the house in a dog crate next to my chair. What was going to happen when I put him outside in the cold? Well, he thrived, that's what happened when I put him outside with MHP. And I was constantly checking on the next batch of chicks to be raised with the heating pad outside. Now it seems as natural as breathing, but that first time was rough!

    Believe me, I've learned just as much from the people on this thread! Some made modifications that worked well for them. Others tried modifications that didn't work so well. But along the way we all learned together. I'm a little surprised that yours were still using it up until 5 weeks. Mine were basically done with it between 3- 4 weeks, and were fully integrated into the coop with the older birds at 4-5 weeks. Not that it matters - what works is what worked for you and your chicks. Every situation is a little different.

    @chonsey If it's that cold in Michigan for your Littles, I can see why you'd want to use both the lamp and the pad. But I don't think they'll use the pad as much if they have the lamp. They do need a rather large area with no heat at all in order to feather out the fastest. If you're using both, I'd leave the water near (but not right at) the lamp just so it doesn't freeze but move the food away from any of the heat, just to force them to use the unheated space.
     

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