Marek's incubation

leadwolf1

Songster
8 Years
May 1, 2011
3,705
116
213
The best thing you can do right now is to quarantine any sick birds. There are many things that can mimic Marek's and are not as devastating. How old is your sick bird? If she is less than 8 weeks old, I doubt that you are dealing with Marek's. It just is very rare to see in a young chick. It takes from 6 - 12 weeks for symptoms to appear once they are exposed to the disease. Where did your chicks come from?

I am thinking you are either dealing with Coccidiosis or a vitamin deficiency. I would treat for Coccidiosis first. You can find Corid at any Tractor Supply in the cattle section. With a vitamin deficiency you need to get poly vi sol, without iron. Dose will depend on age.

It is never too late to vaccinate. It is our only means of fighting this disease.
I've been reading on this forum for an hour because it looks like my flock has been hit with Marek's too.

I have 7 new pullets ranging in age from a few weeks to 16 weeks. The youngest, a black sex link, is the sick one. I knew something wasn't right with her but couldn't see any symptoms I could report until today. She stumbles around and is holding one wing out now. At first I thought she was being bullied so I put her in a separate cage but still in with the other birds. I realize now this was a big mistake.

I will remove her but it's too late - the others have been exposed. I've read enough to know there is no cure but I would appreciate any info on the best steps I can take to keep the others from getting it (this, too, seems like a crap shoot from what I've read, right?).

This is the first time any of my birds have ever been sick so I'm completely uninformed about what to do. Should I vaccinate the others or is it too late? The little sick bird is eating and drinking and mostly mobile. What is the best I can do for her at this point?

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 
Last edited:

leadwolf1

Songster
8 Years
May 1, 2011
3,705
116
213
How old was your chick? I would treat everyone for Coccidiosis. Marek's doesn't go by ambulatory or nonambulatory. It strikes in many, many different ways and there is no telling what you are dealing with without a necropsy. However, the age of the bird can be a factor. If under 8 weeks, treat the rest for Coccidiosis with Corid. It won't hurt them if the don't have it but, it will save them if they do. In the meantime, clean and disinfect everything with a clorox solution.
 

CumberlandView

In the Brooder
7 Years
Sep 6, 2012
33
0
22
Mountains of Tennessee
The best thing you can do right now is to quarantine any sick birds. There are many things that can mimic Marek's and are not as devastating. How old is your sick bird? If she is less than 8 weeks old, I doubt that you are dealing with Marek's. It just is very rare to see in a young chick. It takes from 6 - 12 weeks for symptoms to appear once they are exposed to the disease. Where did your chicks come from?

I am thinking you are either dealing with Coccidiosis or a vitamin deficiency. I would treat for Coccidiosis first. You can find Corid at any Tractor Supply in the cattle section. With a vitamin deficiency you need to get poly vi sol, without iron. Dose will depend on age.

It is never too late to vaccinate. It is our only means of fighting this disease.
I believe the bird was at most 7 or 8 weeks so it sounds like something else. (If you missed my last post, she died this morning).

The chicks all came from a local breeder with hundreds of birds and almost every breed conceivable. Reputable and knowledgeable. Clean and neat as a pin. I could be wrong, but I doubt the bird arrived here with the problem. Please correct me if you think otherwise.

I've lost Guinea fowl keets to Coccidiosis in the past. This baby chick was not kept where those baby Guineas were and it was two years ago I lost the Guineas (and I've disinfected since). However, knowing it has occurred on my farm, I believe you are on to something.

I'm off to TSC. Thank you so very much for your knowledgeable assistance. It is invaluable to me.
 

leadwolf1

Songster
8 Years
May 1, 2011
3,705
116
213
I'm sorry for your loss
hugs.gif
My first thread, I was typing as you were and my advice was too late, sorry.

If it was coccidiosis, no, I doubt she had it when she arrived...although, she might have. Coccidiosis doesn't come from unclean conditions. Even the cleanest most sanitary places can have Coccidia present. It's in the soil, you can't get away from it. Get the Corid and treat everyone. I don't believe you are dealing with any horrible disease. Just keep an eye on everyone else to make sure.
 

CumberlandView

In the Brooder
7 Years
Sep 6, 2012
33
0
22
Mountains of Tennessee
I'm sorry for your loss
hugs.gif
My first thread, I was typing as you were and my advice was too late, sorry.

If it was coccidiosis, no, I doubt she had it when she arrived...although, she might have. Coccidiosis doesn't come from unclean conditions. Even the cleanest most sanitary places can have Coccidia present. It's in the soil, you can't get away from it. Get the Corid and treat everyone. I don't believe you are dealing with any horrible disease. Just keep an eye on everyone else to make sure.
Thank you. I appreciate your kindness and wisdom.
 

downsm75

Songster
7 Years
Apr 23, 2012
833
23
128
Louisville Ky
There is no way, sorry, that anyone can make a Marek's diagnosis without a necropsy.  Without one, there are several other diseases that can present and spread like Marek's, you just do not know what you are dealing with.  There would be no way that I would accept a diagnosis of Marek's without it being confirmed through necropsy.  It is a terrible disease that will effect you and your flock for the rest of your days.  Please, have a necropsy performed so that you will know what it actually going on.
a necropsy is an autopsy, right? That is what her vet preformed. The second chicken is at University of Kentucky for a second opinion.
 

Leslieb118

Songster
8 Years
Nov 8, 2011
443
12
129
Louisville
a necropsy is an autopsy, right? That is what her vet preformed. The second chicken is at University of Kentucky for a second opinion.

I live in Louisville, too, and I sent a chicken to UofK for necropsy. I got a preliminary report within 7 days and the final report about 2 or more weeks later. In the preliminary report they didn't find anything that would tell them anything specific. It was only until they did the lab work and it all came back that I got the diagnosis of Mareks. You can't get a diagnosis of Mareks that quickly from a vet. The necropsy at UofK was very reasonably priced, as was shipping through UPS. I didn't pay for overnight, because as you know, Louisville is UPS hub and it would've still gotten there the next day. I paid $12 for shipping through the UPS store and $20 for necropsy since the chicken was under one year old. They charge $30 for over a year old. The quality of testing far outweighs the cost of everything. That's the route I'd go in the future.
 

downsm75

Songster
7 Years
Apr 23, 2012
833
23
128
Louisville Ky
The first was dissected by a vet, the second is at UK. Takes several weeks for results. They also said labs in live chickens WOULDN'T give a diagnosis. They would like the one that is starting to show symptoms for study. It also now cost 40 for a necropsy at UK
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom