measurement helpppp

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by newbee chick01, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. newbee chick01

    newbee chick01 Out Of The Brooder

    80
    0
    39
    Dec 14, 2011
    if i build a coop 4x5 ft and run 5x10 ft how many chickens could this suitably home?? ive got 2 silkies,2 rhode island reds,2 bantams and 2 chamois polish [​IMG]
     
  2. The Lazy L

    The Lazy L Chillin' With My Peeps

    739
    64
    148
    Dec 16, 2011
    1868
    Quote:Coop

    4' x 5' = 20 foot square / 2 = 10 chickens holding wingtips, inhaling and exhaling together singing Kumbaya.

    4' x 5' = 20 foot square / 3 = 6 chickens with elbow room.

    Run

    5' x 10' = 50 foot square / 5 = 10 chickens.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

    20,308
    3,613
    496
    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    There are so many variables involved it is really hard to say. Each individual chicken's personality, flock dynamics, your climate, how you manage them, and how much work you want to do all enter in. You might read this to help you make a decision.


    Some of the things that make up the space requirement are, in my opinion:

    1. Personal space for the birds. They have different personalities and different individual requirements. Some are very possessive of personal space and some can share.

    2. Access to feeder and waterer. The general recommendation is that they all be able to eat at one time, but access to the waterer is also important. Part of this is that they seem to like to all eat at once but not necessarily drink at the same time. Part of it is that a dominant bird may keep others from eating or drinking, especially with limited access.

    3. Being able to put the feeder and waterer where they will not poop in it when they roost.

    4. Roost space. They not only need to have enough room to roost, they need to have enough room for them to sort out who gets to sleep next to whom and who gets the prime spots. They also need enough room to get on the roosts and get off them. When they get on, they may jump from some midway support or fly directly to the roost, but either way, they like to spread their wings. And some chickens seem to enjoy blocking the entry points if there are limits. And when they get off, mine tend to want to fly down, not jump to a halfway point. They need room to fly down without bumping into feeders, waterers, nesting boxes, or a wall.

    5. Poop load. The larger area they have the less often you have to actively manage the poop. They poop a lot while on the roost so you may have to give that area special consideration, but mucking out the entire coop can be backbreaking work plus you have to have some place to put all that bedding and poop. In my opinion, totally cleaning out the coop is something that needs to happen as seldom as possible.

    6. How often are they able to get out of the coop. The more they are confined to the coop, the larger the personal space needs to be. The normal recommendation on this forum is 4 square feet per full sized chicken with a minimum of 10 square feet of run per bird. This additional requirement outside is sometimes not mentioned. How often they are allowed out of the coop may depend on a lot more than just weather. Your work schedule, when you are able to turn them loose, what time of day you open the pop door to let them out or lock them up at night, all this and more enters into the equation. The 4 square feet recommendation assumes they will spend extended time in the coop and not be able to get in the run. What that extended time can safely be depends on a lot of different factor so there is no one correct length of time for everyone.

    7. Do you feed and water in the coop or outside. The more they are outside, the less pressure on the size of the coop.

    8. The size of the chicken. Bantams require less room than full sized chickens. This has to be tempered by breed and the individual personalities. Some bantams can be more protective of personal space than others, but this is also true of full sized breeds.

    9. The breed of the chicken. Some handle confinement better than others.

    10. The number of chickens. The greater the number of chickens, the more personal space they can have if the square foot per chicken stays constant. Let me explain. Assume each chicken occupies 1 square foot of space. If you have two chickens and 4 square feet per chicken, the two chickens occupy 2 square feet, which leaves 6 square feet for them to explore. If you have ten chickens with 4 square feet per chicken, each chicken has 30 unoccupied square feet to explore. A greater number also can give more space to position the feeders and waterers properly in relation to the roosts and provide access. I’m not encouraging you to crowd your birds if you have a large number of them. I’m trying to say you are more likely to get in trouble with 4 square feet per chicken if you have very few chickens.

    11. What is your flock make-up. A flock with more than one rooster may be more peaceful if it has more space. I don't want to start the argument about number or roosters here as I know more than one rooster can often peacefully coexist with a flock, but I firmly believe more space helps.

    12. What is the maximum number of chickens you will have. Consider hatching chicks or bringing in replacements. Look down the road a bit.

    13. Do you want a broody to raise chicks with the flock? A broody needs sufficient room to work with or you risk problems from other chickens.

    14. The more space you have, the easier it is to integrate chickens.

    I'm sure I am missing several components, but the point I'm trying to make is that we all have different conditions. There is no magic number that suits us all. The 4 square feet in a coop with 10 square feet in the run is a good rule of thumb for a minimum that most of the time will keep us out of trouble, but not always. I do believe that more is better both in the coop and in the run.
     
  4. newbee chick01

    newbee chick01 Out Of The Brooder

    80
    0
    39
    Dec 14, 2011
    thanks for the replys.they have full run of the garden between 8am and 4pm at mo due early sun set the foxes are out gone by 7am and are bk arround 6ish grrrr.they seem fine with that because of the cold weather at moment.i`m sooo rubish with measurements lol:D want them all to be comfy tho hmmmm,,,, so if 4x5ft equals 20sq ft thats recommended for 5 hens?so i need 2 roughly double 1st plans am i right??????
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  5. jerryb

    jerryb Chillin' With My Peeps

    128
    2
    80
    Oct 7, 2011
    Southern Michigan
    based on my situation I think you would have a full house right away. go for more space if you can, just in case you get another bird, or six . . .
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by