multiple questions

jcschild

Chirping
6 Years
Oct 18, 2015
6
0
62
Hey Guys,
been looking thru numerous threads. still not finding the answer. the majority is about coop design.
i intend to have combo girls (meat and eggs) and of course a rooster is needed.
my goal is to be self sufficient (never have to buy chics again for multiple reasons)
my intended size of coop is either 10x20 or 12 x 16. i want room for 50 girls (of course i can eat the boys too)
contemplating doing 1/2 now with just eggs and adding on later to increase size for the meat aspect
i see a lot of comments about separating the broody hens.
should i keep the 2 sides separate or 1 long coop. bear in mind i only want 1 type hen for both.

also what hen is recommended for both
how many nest boxes
thanks so much
Scott
 

Anime2lover

Free Ranging
Apr 17, 2019
3,999
14,439
507
Hey Guys,
been looking thru numerous threads. still not finding the answer. the majority is about coop design.
i intend to have combo girls (meat and eggs) and of course a rooster is needed.
my goal is to be self sufficient (never have to buy chics again for multiple reasons)
my intended size of coop is either 10x20 or 12 x 16. i want room for 50 girls (of course i can eat the boys too)
contemplating doing 1/2 now with just eggs and adding on later to increase size for the meat aspect
i see a lot of comments about separating the broody hens.
should i keep the 2 sides separate or 1 long coop. bear in mind i only want 1 type hen for both.

also what hen is recommended for both
how many nest boxes
thanks so much
Scott
Easter eggers ans black australorps are excellent for meat and eggs.
 

TK421

Songster
10 Years
May 24, 2010
293
162
191
Central TX
My strong advice is to build a setup with multiple compartments for maximum flexibility. Integrating different aged birds every time you do a round of meat birds is tough, and you may decide that you want to try a different breed at some point, or feed the meat birds different feed. Since you’re trying to operate without buying chicks, I do think a small broody area or a broody pen would be good. In this recommendation, the decision becomes how big is the compartment? a Small broody area could double as a sick pen when you’re not raising meat birds. I’ve always wanted a large coop that Is divided in half or thirds but where I could open the divisions if I wanted. Maximum flexibility in case my goals change or in case I want to try something new in 5 years.

nest boxes: I’ve read 3-4 hens/nest box. if you’re shooting for 50 birds total, and what? Maybe 2/3 will be female?? So 8-10 nestboxes?
 

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