My chicken stopped standing!! Why??

Bigjohn840

Chirping
Nov 2, 2018
24
27
54
Alabama
My Coop
My Coop
I have 2 cornish crosses I got from tsc and one of them cant stand anymore and I dont know why. I found it laying on its side and its head had been pecked bloody. It cant stand so I put it in a cage and didn't feed it for a bit hoping that it just got too fat too quick. But it has lost weight and still cant stand one of its feet look weird like the toe is broken but it doesn't feel broken when I move it around I'm super green in raising chickens so any input helps here's a picture of its foot
 

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Bigjohn840

Chirping
Nov 2, 2018
24
27
54
Alabama
My Coop
My Coop
How old is this hen? Who pecked it? Are these two Cornish crosses with other birds? The legs do remind me of Marek’s disease, unfortunately. What is the purple?

about 12 week maybe a bit older, I didnt see exactly who pecked it but I'm assuming they all had a go at it. Yes they are. Blukote
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
7,127
8,756
556
Consett Co.Durham. UK
Is there a reason why you are trying to keep a Cornish cross past butchering age? They are prone to leg and heart problems due to their fast growth and if you plan to keep them as "pets" you really need to limit food from the start. It is not fair to the bird to suddenly remove food and can cause more harm than good anyway.
From the little we can see of the bird in the photo, I too would suspect it has Marek's as it looks to be in classic Marek's splits posture and the age of the bird ties in with Marek's. Other birds will often attack them once they become incapacitated with it. Many people cull birds that they suspect may have Marek's as it is infectious although by the time symptoms appear, they may all have been exposed. I usually offer supportive care but with this being a Cornish Cross and having already been attacked by it's flock and injured as well as the probably Marek's, I think it would be kinder to euthanize. If it was a smaller bird with some hope of longevity and possibly recovering from an outbreak of Marek's and returning to the flock, then it might be worth persevering but with such a large bird that will have mobility problems as well as other organs no doubt under pressure and the flock having set upon it, there is little hope of any quality of life for it if it can survive this paralysis outbreak.
 

Bigjohn840

Chirping
Nov 2, 2018
24
27
54
Alabama
My Coop
My Coop
Is there a reason why you are trying to keep a Cornish cross past butchering age? They are prone to leg and heart problems due to their fast growth and if you plan to keep them as "pets" you really need to limit food from the start. It is not fair to the bird to suddenly remove food and can cause more harm than good anyway.
From the little we can see of the bird in the photo, I too would suspect it has Marek's as it looks to be in classic Marek's splits posture and the age of the bird ties in with Marek's. Other birds will often attack them once they become incapacitated with it. Many people cull birds that they suspect may have Marek's as it is infectious although by the time symptoms appear, they may all have been exposed. I usually offer supportive care but with this being a Cornish Cross and having already been attacked by it's flock and injured as well as the probably Marek's, I think it would be kinder to euthanize. If it was a smaller bird with some hope of longevity and possibly recovering from an outbreak of Marek's and returning to the flock, then it might be worth persevering but with such a large bird that will have mobility problems as well as other organs no doubt under pressure and the flock having set upon it, there is little hope of any quality of life for it if it can survive this paralysis outbreak.
Ok thank you for your information it's been very helpful I'll be culling it asap
 

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