maddieekennedy

In the Brooder
Aug 9, 2020
16
13
23
Last night at around 6:30 pm my two white pekin ducks were attacked by what we believe to be a weasel. They are still alive and I took them to an emergency exotic vet last night. They were cleaned, given antibiotics and pain medicine. Today, they seem to be struggling just the same. They were both attacked on the backs of their necks and have some bites on their chests. The attack was not severe, I think that I got to them while the weasel was attacking and scared it off. I don’t know if they’re just in shock and traumatized, or if their situation is worse than it seems. Neither of them have ate yet. They have kind of pecked at food but will not try and eat it. They also are not drinking much water. I am keeping them inside in an area where they are warm. I am worried about them not eating. They won’t quack at all either and they are usually very talkative. The vet said she believes they will be able to recover just fine. Do you think they are just still in shock? Or could something be worse?
 

CluckerFamily

Enabler
5 Years
Feb 14, 2016
10,397
61,026
1,131
Wisconsin
Thank

Thanks for your reply! Do you know how long is normal for a duck to stay in shock after this kind of trauma?
I only have chickens and haven't had the experience with an attack just their response to predators close.
I'm not sure how long the shock will last but I would say weeks to months.

Were they in the coop at the time of attack? Weasels can be very sly and unforgiving.
 

maddieekennedy

In the Brooder
Aug 9, 2020
16
13
23
I only have chickens and haven't had the experience with an attack just their response to predators close.
I'm not sure how long the shock will last but I would say weeks to months.

Were they in the coop at the time of attack? Weasels can be very sly and unforgiving.
We have a very small fenced in area under our patio, they were hanging out there for a little bit while I was cleaning up. I called to them and they didn’t quack so I knew something was wrong. One of them can’t hold her head up right which concerns me as well. I feel terrible for the poor babies :( I hope they’ll want to eat soon.
 

maddieekennedy

In the Brooder
Aug 9, 2020
16
13
23
I feel your pain and I will pray for your ducks. try to give them some water. that is more important than food at the moment. they are in shock and in pain as well. I hope the medicines will help them.

good luck and keep us posted :hugs
Thank you! Yes that’s what I thought as well. I’m not sure if you have any experience, but if you do, are you sure about how long they could experience shock from an event like this?
 

Quatie

Crowing
Oct 16, 2020
2,335
11,478
441
Northern California
You could bring your ducks in to monitor and care for them easier. The main thing is too keep them hydrated till they start to feel more themselves. You can give them some Gatorade or Pedialyte to help keep them hydrated.

Some animals die from dehydration or starvation instead of the injury. You want to prevent the animal front getting to that point. Then they will have time to heal their injuries. @Isaac 0 is more knowledge about this.
 

CluckerFamily

Enabler
5 Years
Feb 14, 2016
10,397
61,026
1,131
Wisconsin
We have a very small fenced in area under our patio, they were hanging out there for a little bit while I was cleaning up. I called to them and they didn’t quack so I knew something was wrong. One of them can’t hold her head up right which concerns me as well. I feel terrible for the poor babies :( I hope they’ll want to eat soon.

I am so sorry.
Do ducks eat a mash? This is what I would do if they were chickens.
If you have a trail camera, you may want to put that up to try and catch the little culprit and set a plan to capture it.
 

maddieekennedy

In the Brooder
Aug 9, 2020
16
13
23
You could bring your ducks in to monitor and care for them easier. The main thing is too keep them hydrated till they start to feel more themselves. You can give them some Gatorade or Pedialyte to help keep them hydrated.

Some animals die from dehydration or starvation instead of the injury. You want to prevent the animal front getting to that point. Then they will have time to heal their injuries. @Isaac 0 is more knowledge about this.
Thank you, that’s what I was worried about. It’s only the morning after and they have drank a little water. They were also given fluids at the vet last night. I’m just not sure at what point in time I should be more concerned about their eating.
 

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