My hen has a frost bitten comb!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chicks Galore3, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    My gold star has a frost bitten comb! The end of it by her neck is bleeding pretty good. At least, I THINK it is frost bite. It was about 30-35 degrees outside. I separated her from the rest of them, so they don't peck at her. I checked the rest, and one has a tiny itty bitty spot of blood on hers, too. Is there a cure? If not, what should I do to help it heal or make the hen comfortable. Should I bring her inside to warm up, or not?

    CG3
     
  2. flockoffour

    flockoffour Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Try putting vaseline or some other petroleum product like that on their combs. This will prevent it from getting frosbit.
     
  3. PAchickengirl

    PAchickengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm no expert, but 30-35 degrees seems kind of high temp. for frostbite. Did it turn a different color?
     
  4. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    I don't think so...Should I get some pictures?
     
  5. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    It was actually mid to upper twenties. I'm am thinking that maybe was getting picked at, because my wyandottes, who have bigger combs, were not affected.
     
  6. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    [​IMG] This is her, Nosy.

    [​IMG] This is nosy

    [​IMG] This is crumpet. You can see Crumpet has the curving part to her comb- nosy doesn't. She DID. Does it look frost bitten or something else?
     
  7. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    We went out to let them out- There was some blood where nosy was. :( She must of opened the wound again. Is there any type of infection she could get? What can I do to keep it clean. Is there ANYTHING I could do?!?!?!
     
  8. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not sure what to do for the immediate problem, but if you are in a cold winter area, you should consider raising birds with rose, pea, or walnut combs. These low, thick combs are much less susceptible to frostbite. You mentioned your wyandottes were not affected. That's because they have low, thick rose combs. So even though the wyandotte combs are big, they do not suffer frostbite. The thin, plate-like single combs (like that of your gold star) have a lot of surface area so they lose heat quickly and can freeze. It's sort of like comparing your butt to your finger. [​IMG] Your butt is much bigger, but it doesn't lose heat as quickly as your long, thin finger does. Your fingers are vulnerable to frost bite. Your butt is not.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  9. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    OH that makes sense...So, there isn't really anything to do besides make the hen comfortable as possible and wait for it to heal, and try to keep it from breaking open?
     
  10. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's what I would think. But once chickens see blood, they tend to peck at it, which can turn into brutal bullying, so if you see anyone pick on her, separate her until the comb heals.
     

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