My Quail are dying! Help please

Michelle12345

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 27, 2014
13
0
22
I had 2 males and 5 female Japaneese Quail. The have been laying well for over 6 months are close to 9 months old.
1 went broody and laid, sat and hatched 3 chicks. Just before they hatched, one of my males died.
I brought the chicks inside to be under the heat lamp as she sometime wandered off and I was worried they would get too cold.
I brought her in with them - anyway she died last week and today the third adult was dying.

They all presented the same:
fluffed up feathers
white and clear feces
eyes kept closing
just before death jerking head movements.

I have heard this is quail disease. I have only 1 male and 3 female left plus the three chicks.
Please help - why did they get this and how can I stop it.
If read that if this is QD then it is 100% fatal.
Michelle
 

Michelle12345

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 27, 2014
13
0
22
No and there are no chickens within at least 1 mile.
I wormed them all about a week ago.

I feed them:
ground up poultry pellets and sometime some chick starter.
I have to go back to the shop to get the mix they make up for them which they like (chick starter and finch mix)

Am worried they all have something wrong and it's a matter of time. They haven't lost any weight and they look excellent then go downhill and die within 15-24 hours.
 

Michelle12345

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 27, 2014
13
0
22
I read this in a Quail and Poulty sitd:



Introduction


Ulcerative Enteritis is an acute, highly contagious disease of chickens and quail caused by the bacterium Clostridium colinum and characterised by ulcers of the intestines and caecae. It can start suddenly and cause high mortality: 100% in quail and 10% in chickens. Turkeys, game birds and pigeons may also be affected. The condition occurs worldwide. The route of infection is oral and transmission is from faeces of sick or carrier birds or via flies. The bacterium resists boiling for 3 minutes. Predisposing factors include Coccidiosis (especially E. necatrix, E. tenella, and E. brunetti), IBDV and overcrowding.
Signs

  • Listlessness.
  • Retracted neck.
  • Drooping wings.
  • Partially closed eyes.
  • Ruffled feathers.
  • Diarrhoea.
  • Anaemia.
  • Watery white faeces (quail).
 

couturnixquail

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 12, 2014
77
0
41
California
well i found this Paragraph on how to treat
Prevention, Treatment, and Control

Bacitracin in the feed at 200 g/ton is used for prevention in quail. Streptomycin (0.006%) and furazolidone (0.02%) in the feed are effective to treat the disease. Prevention must start with good management practices (eg, avoiding the introduction of new birds into existing flocks). High population density is a predisposing factor. The use of cages is recommended in quail breeding. Sick and dead birds should be removed promptly. Total cleanup between flocks, pest control in and around the premises, and periodic treatment of watering systems with innocuous chemicals that dissolve mineral and or biofilm build-up are good preventive measures.




This was on http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/pou...rview_of_ulcerative_enteritis_in_poultry.html
 

Michelle12345

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 27, 2014
13
0
22
Baby quails have been separated from flock as they get pecked so that's good.

However my last male isn't looking flash so have just moved him into ilsolation and **** he has diarrhea too.
also found this... I keep my quail on the ground with lots of room and natural habitat.

Quail Disease: This is a bacterial disease. There are two forms of quail disease. The first form is highly chronic and a mortality rate of 100% is observed among the infected birds. The major symptom is diarrhea, with white colored feces. The second form of quail disease prevails for a longer period of time. Loss of appetite is the major symptom. Birds affected with this disease will die within 6 to 10 months due to gradual weight loss. Medicines like Streptomycin and Bacitracin are administered in the treatment of quail disease.
 

vtspilotcar

In the Brooder
5 Years
Feb 2, 2014
33
2
26
If you can get ahold of any of those meds I would start treating them. Thats a nasty bacteria to have. If not medicated starter should have what it needs in it to help. Ask the feed store to see the label. All you quail cages and equipment will need to be cleaned and disinfected.
Good luck
 

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