My rabbits had babies… what now?

NatJ

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Soooooo… the female is showing nesting behaviors, I googled it, and is collecting straw in her mouth. Is there any point in keeping the male away from her, besides potential aggression? I have an appointment for him to get fixed on the 28th.
Yes, keep the male away, unless you want her to get pregnant AGAIN as soon as she gives birth this time!
 

Smileybans

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Yes, keep the male away, unless you want her to get pregnant AGAIN as soon as she gives birth this time!
Wait… what? If I were to let the male out now for a short period of time but then keep him away after his surgery, I’m not doing this but considered it, she could get pregnant right away even tho she’s probably pregnant now and the male isn’t near her after she gives birth?? I’d keep the male away until hes sterile, I plan on doing that anyway, but what?
 

ColtHandorf

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I'm pretty sure the spay is easier & cheaper if she is NOT pregnant at the time.
Spaying is more invasive and is never cheaper IMO. Neutering is not as complicated.
Rabbits are not as social as people think they are. As for not separating them, either they will continue to get along or they won't.
While native rabbits in the US aren't super social, domesticated rabbits are descended from selectively bred wild rabbits in Europe that are much larger and more social than our native buns. They live in large warrens and this is generally why people suggest keeping them in pairs/groups. That being said, setups for them in captivity are much, much smaller than the unlimited space of the wild where they can spread out and give one another space while still living in the social groups they prefer.
Soooooo… the female is showing nesting behaviors, I googled it, and is collecting straw in her mouth. Is there any point in keeping the male away from her, besides potential aggression? I have an appointment for him to get fixed on the 28th.
Absolutely there is a point. If they are currently together, with the first litter of bunnies, when she kindles (gives birth) she can be bred back immediately. All lagomorphs and rodents can do this. In addition to it not being conducive to stopping the breeding issue, it is also not healthy for a female to be both nursing and devoting bodily resources to a litter of unborn kits. This is the same reason doctors tell women not to get pregnant back-to-back. if she's getting ready to nest, and you're confident the first litter is eating on their own I would separate them and dad in a manner that allows the doe to still interact with them through the wire so that a bothersome reintroduction after the neutering isn't an issue, but so he can re-impregnate her the moment she's through giving birth.
Wait… what? If I were to let the male out now for a short period of time but then keep him away after his surgery, I’m not doing this but considered it, she could get pregnant right away even tho she’s probably pregnant now and the male isn’t near her after she gives birth?? I’d keep the male away until hes sterile, I plan on doing that anyway, but what?
if the male is currently on his own, leave him that way. It'll be much easier and you won't have to worry about baby Jesus rabbits and immaculate conceptions.
 

sybonbon

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My vet got the sex wrong, and the person I got them from, I’m sure I’ll get it wrong too. But I will get the male fixed. As soon as I find out which it is. I think I have an idea which one is which. There’s an all black one that the babies hang out around more. That one is more likely the female right?

This is their enclosure. The hole/ den they dug is between the hutch and the heavy blanket. As far as I can see there’s only two babies. View attachment 2953874
The female would be lactating. That would be obvious.
 

Smileybans

Crowing
Nov 13, 2020
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Spaying is more invasive and is never cheaper IMO. Neutering is not as complicated.

While native rabbits in the US aren't super social, domesticated rabbits are descended from selectively bred wild rabbits in Europe that are much larger and more social than our native buns. They live in large warrens and this is generally why people suggest keeping them in pairs/groups. That being said, setups for them in captivity are much, much smaller than the unlimited space of the wild where they can spread out and give one another space while still living in the social groups they prefer.

Absolutely there is a point. If they are currently together, with the first litter of bunnies, when she kindles (gives birth) she can be bred back immediately. All lagomorphs and rodents can do this. In addition to it not being conducive to stopping the breeding issue, it is also not healthy for a female to be both nursing and devoting bodily resources to a litter of unborn kits. This is the same reason doctors tell women not to get pregnant back-to-back. if she's getting ready to nest, and you're confident the first litter is eating on their own I would separate them and dad in a manner that allows the doe to still interact with them through the wire so that a bothersome reintroduction after the neutering isn't an issue, but so he can re-impregnate her the moment she's through giving birth.

if the male is currently on his own, leave him that way. It'll be much easier and you won't have to worry about baby Jesus rabbits and immaculate conceptions.
I have him in a two level hutch with him in just the top half. But he started chewing his way out of the hutch so I’m going to close the bottom of the hutch and allow him access to the bottom half. I was worried about reintroducing them later but she does visit him. I should not put the babies in with him correct? They should have their own area?

He is definitely lonely in the hutch by himself. Whenever I open the door to give him food and water he greets me. He has always been the first to greet me and come over to climb on me but his disposition is different now. Is there anything I can do to keep him happy while he’s in quarantine until he’s sterile?

I am not 100% sure she’s pregnant but many people here agree she is and I saw her carrying hay in her mouth. She took it into the chicken coop again. Would she reuse the same nest or make a new one?
 

NatJ

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Would she reuse the same nest or make a new one?
Either one is possible.

Wait… what? If I were to let the male out now for a short period of time but then keep him away after his surgery, I’m not doing this but considered it, she could get pregnant right away even tho she’s probably pregnant now and the male isn’t near her after she gives birth?? I’d keep the male away until hes sterile, I plan on doing that anyway, but what?
If she is carrying material around to build a nest, she will probably give birth within the next 3 days or so.

If she is pregnant now, she cannot get pregnant again while she is pregnant.

But if she gives birth, then as soon as the last bunny is born, she will be not-pregnant, and can get pregnant again. Rabbits usually give birth at night, so by the time you come out and check on them the next morning she could be pregnant again (if the buck is in the pen with her.)

No, I would not let the buck out with the doe, at all, for any reason, until after he's been neutered.

Spaying is more invasive and is never cheaper IMO. Neutering is not as complicated.
Yes, of course neutering the male will be cheaper and less invasive than spaying the female.

I was trying to compare spaying a pregnant doe vs. spaying a doe who is not pregnant. If she is pregnant, it is more difficult and more expensive than if she is not pregnant.

When to spay the female will only matter if OP wants them both altered.
If OP only wants to have one altered, then yes I agree the male is the logical choice.
 

Smileybans

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Okay. The male won’t be let out then and I made it so they can see each other better through the bars of the hutch. I think that will make him feel better.

I checked the old nest, in the chicken coop, and found this.
295CC871-6059-4CE1-9BE4-95247125E157.jpeg

New straw has been added to it. Before it was just the fur.
The babies are spending most of their time in a hole in the ground. Really only coming out to eat and drink. I’m thinking of putting wire or a cage over it so they’ll be separate from the mother. Will that be okay or should I remove them from the run totally?
 

NatJ

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The babies are spending most of their time in a hole in the ground. Really only coming out to eat and drink. I’m thinking of putting wire or a cage over it so they’ll be separate from the mother. Will that be okay or should I remove them from the run totally?
I think that should be fine for now. Until you're ready to actually re-home them, I don't see any need for them to be separated more than that.
 

PeabodyFamilyFarm

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Jan 15, 2022
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First thing you should do is separate them. The buck is liable to kill the babies. So long has she had them in some type of box and pulled hair for them they should be fine so long as they are out of the wind and elements.
My buck has never tried to kill the babies. He actually is as protective of them as mom. But rabbits can get pregnant again almost instantly so I agree that the first step is separating the buck from the mom and babies since you don't want to breed them.
 

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