My rooster keeps attacking me!!!!1

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speckledhen

Intentional Solitude
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Feb 3, 2007
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Blue Ridge Mtns. of North Georgia
If I was still a moderator, I would close this thread. This has been my experience in dealing with trying to help others with their aggressive roosters as well as their chicken health dramas. Often, someone will ask for help, then they will proceed to say why they can't do this or that and argue constantly with others who have far more experience with these issues. I would advise anyone who asks for advice to be thankful when it is given, say you will consider the options and be grateful others took the time to try to help.

I have been breeding chickens for over 15 years now and have dealt with both hatchery stock, highly unpredictable, as well as good quality breeder stock. Temperament is an inherited trait for the most part. Easygoing males usually produce more of the same, which is why I have not had a mean rooster in 14 years. Breed from the best, cull the rest. Once a rooster begins to flog you after his hormones have kicked in, it's over. It's almost impossible to permanently change his behavior. After all, he's an animal with a brain the size of a walnut and also, like a bull or stallion in a smaller package. He is not a dog and does not learn exactly like one. If he is human aggressive, think of that is like a badly bred puppy mill dog that bites and must be put down. He is genetically programmed to be aggressive. Of course, there are more rare situations where roosters can change behavior due to a high stress incident, but yours is young and this is his temperament.

Not sure how you think you solved the issue, but all this information I am giving you is for the future, put it in your knowledge bank so you'll know next time. The last large fowl rooster to attack me was made into stew; even though I had a home for him to go to, it was unwise to propagate his genes. This was a breed that was trying to be recreated from the brink of extinction and no way should I have kept a substandard specimen. Life is just too short to have to watch your back in the chicken pen. Also, I have found that the more intelligent roosters are the most easygoing, the least human aggressive. The dumb ones attack the hand that feeds and waters them.

I hope some of this makes sense to you. Good luck.
 

salshep20

Songster
Jan 28, 2021
359
634
136
If I was still a moderator, I would close this thread. This has been my experience in dealing with trying to help others with their aggressive roosters as well as their chicken health dramas. Often, someone will ask for help, then they will proceed to say why they can't do this or that and argue constantly with others who have far more experience with these issues. I would advise anyone who asks for advice to be thankful when it is given, say you will consider the options and be grateful others took the time to try to help.

I have been breeding chickens for over 15 years now and have dealt with both hatchery stock, highly unpredictable, as well as good quality breeder stock. Temperament is an inherited trait for the most part. Easygoing males usually produce more of the same, which is why I have not had a mean rooster in 14 years. Breed from the best, cull the rest. Once a rooster begins to flog you after his hormones have kicked in, it's over. It's almost impossible to permanently change his behavior. After all, he's an animal with a brain the size of a walnut and also, like a bull or stallion in a smaller package. He is not a dog and does not learn exactly like one. If he is human aggressive, think of that is like a badly bred puppy mill dog that bites and must be put down. He is genetically programmed to be aggressive. Of course, there are more rare situations where roosters can change behavior due to a high stress incident, but yours is young and this is his temperament.

Not sure how you think you solved the issue, but all this information I am giving you is for the future, put it in your knowledge bank so you'll know next time. The last large fowl rooster to attack me was made into stew; even though I had a home for him to go to, it was unwise to propagate his genes. This was a breed that was trying to be recreated from the brink of extinction and no way should I have kept a substandard specimen. Life is just too short to have to watch your back in the chicken pen. Also, I have found that the more intelligent roosters are the most easygoing, the least human aggressive. The dumb ones attack the hand that feeds and waters them.

I hope some of this makes sense to you. Good luck.
u sound smart thanks
 
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