Need information about roosters

jazzymbf

In the Brooder
5 Years
Apr 25, 2014
11
0
22
So I recently started my first flock and ordered 8 pullets. One didnt make it and now Im pretty sure one of my Barred Rocks is a rooster. His comb is much redder and bigger than my other Barred Rock and he now crows a little bit. I tried to get a friend with a large flock to take him, but her roosters are too aggressive for this one. He's about 7 weeks old. I don't know what to do with him because he's my favorite of my flock and is the most affectionate of my flock. He's calm and submissive to my largest pullet.

My concern is if I cant find him a home, Id like to keep him. However since Im new to this, I dont know if he'd be noisy being by himself, or maybe calmer. He is handled every day and greets me when I see him. Id hate to get rid of him, but Id like some information about what Id be getting myself into for keeping him.

Any information would be appreciated. Thanks
 

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,905
655
296
Australia
Yes, he is a male.

Noisiness depends mainly on genetics but also individual predispositions and experiences, and health. So basically he will be noisy if he's genetically inclined to it and healthy, but being unwell, or harassed regularly, can make him either noisier or quieter. Leghorns are terrible for noise levels and frequency. I don't know about BRs though, I did have some once but they were pretty average.

They crow regardless of having other males around or not, but having others around can inspire them to crow more, in reply.

As for what to expect in terms of aggression and so forth, it helps to remember chickens are individuals too, and nowhere near as stupid as the average perception of them states. The dumber he is, the more likely he is to be aggressive. Smart chooks know not to peck or spur the hand that feeds them.

What you put up with and breed on is what you'll get so if he turns into a bully or aggressive one, and you keep him, you'll only ever have more of that, but there are plenty of non aggressive males out there so please don't be fooled into blaming it all on his gender like some do. Just like with other domestic animals, it all comes down to the individual. Judge him on his own merit like you would any other animal, not on his gender or some expectation of him becoming a rabid killer just because he's male.

Best wishes.
 

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,905
655
296
Australia
haha Thanks! Its been a great resource.

And thank you so much for the information. Ill definitely relay that to my family in our decision about him.
You're welcome. I would like to add that you wills see a ton of totally conflicting stances on this site regarding rooster management, but at the end of the day the only universal truth there is that all roosters are not the same.

Some say don't handfeed him, don't handle him, or he'll attack.

Some say do handfeed him, do handle him, or he'll attack.

Neither are totally true. The rooster inclined to attack will do so no matter what you do, and the rooster not inclined to attack won't do so no matter what you do. Of course there are some 'grey' individuals who may never attack if for example never given the chance, even though they have some level of human aggressive mentality lurking not far beneath the surface. These traits are bred in and out easily, generally over a half-dozen generations of not being enabled to act on the impulse, or being enabled to act on it.

In my experience it's basically all down to the rooster's inherited inclinations towards human aggressive behavior and mentality. I handled and handfed all of mine and out of many hundreds of roosters I raised and kept, only a rooster bred and partially raised by someone who kept human-aggressive birds attacked a human. I culled out aggressive behaviors and soon enough didn't have a problem.

It's a bit like with dogs or other animals. Good ones tolerate abuse or mismanagement without turning on people, whereas bad ones don't need to be abused or mismanaged before they do. Not advocating abuse or mismanagement, obviously, just pointing out the flaw in the common idea that what you do is what drives their behavior more than their inherited traits.

Best wishes.
 

newmarch2014

Songster
5 Years
Mar 27, 2014
1,130
120
181
I have a very experience chicken friend and we just had a discussion about roosters. They have one that is years old and never aggressive ever and was pampered, another that was a killer rooster that was never coddled. I agree with above, it is simply the inherent personality of that particular bird. Be prepared to have it go badly and need to recitfy the situation immediately (as my father used to say " know where that shovel is at all times so that you can equalize the situation if he gets mean one day'')
 

lovemy6hens

Songster
6 Years
Nov 4, 2013
913
121
191
Central Texas
Read & read again. Best summary of rooster management I've read.

You're welcome. I would like to add that you wills see a ton of totally conflicting stances on this site regarding rooster management, but at the end of the day the only universal truth there is that all roosters are not the same.

Some say don't handfeed him, don't handle him, or he'll attack.

Some say do handfeed him, do handle him, or he'll attack.

Neither are totally true. The rooster inclined to attack will do so no matter what you do, and the rooster not inclined to attack won't do so no matter what you do. Of course there are some 'grey' individuals who may never attack if for example never given the chance, even though they have some level of human aggressive mentality lurking not far beneath the surface. These traits are bred in and out easily, generally over a half-dozen generations of not being enabled to act on the impulse, or being enabled to act on it.

In my experience it's basically all down to the rooster's inherited inclinations towards human aggressive behavior and mentality. I handled and handfed all of mine and out of many hundreds of roosters I raised and kept, only a rooster bred and partially raised by someone who kept human-aggressive birds attacked a human. I culled out aggressive behaviors and soon enough didn't have a problem. 

It's a bit like with dogs or other animals. Good ones tolerate abuse or mismanagement without turning on people, whereas bad ones don't need to be abused or mismanaged before they do. Not advocating abuse or mismanagement, obviously, just pointing out the flaw in the common idea that what you do is what drives their behavior more than their inherited traits.

Best wishes.
 
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