need information about what I found after necropsy

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by sinkorswim, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. Seatrout00

    Seatrout00 Songster

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    Oct 18, 2012
    Melbourne Florida
    I don't think you have any reason at all to feel bad about showing your hen mercy - to second guess your gut feeling and let her go on in pain would likely make you feel even worse, not to mention what it would due to the hen! If anything, I think you should feel comforted that your hen had the very best life and care and was shown mercy - and she has you to thank for that.
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude

    Christy, what I suggest is that you get breeds from the hatchery that are not the usual egg production types, if you can find them. I've had the LEAST problems out of my hatchery Brahma hens. Brahmas are not what most folks think of first for egg production, though my hatchery Brahmas were excellent layers for their first 3-4 years.

    My Light Brahma lived to be 5 1/2 with no egg issues, though I feel she did die from cancer in the end. She was laying 4 weeks prior to that. And her "sister", the Buff Brahma, will be 6 years old in January and has never had any egg issues whatsoever. She doesn't lay that often, but when she does, she lays about 3 eggs per week for a few weeks, then quits for a few months. That's not too shabby for her age and genetics, in my experience.

    I have only one other direct hatchery hen now, a Silver Phoenix, again, not one you'd think of first for egg production. Her eggs are very small for a Large Fowl hen (Phoenix are small bodied for a standard breed), but I hope she will not have issues. She is currently broody for the second time this year. I also feel that the ones who take long breaks to raise chicks have better chances to avoid reproductive malfunctions-their bodies get a good rest.
     
  3. sinkorswim

    sinkorswim In the Brooder

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    Apr 12, 2012
    Melbourne,Florida
    Thank you for the kind words.And you are probably right.Its just the "what if" always lingers.It was painful to loose her when she was so young.I feel helpless in the fact I couldn't "fix" her.
    Thank you-
    addicted2chickens
     
  4. sinkorswim

    sinkorswim In the Brooder

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    Apr 12, 2012
    Melbourne,Florida
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude

    To be honest, draining is not a fix for the fluid retention associated with egg yolk peritonitis or internal laying. It's a temporary relief for the hen, less stress on the organs for a time, but the condition is chronic and the fluid/infection will return. How we drained her was rather intuitive-we just inserted the needle into the most rounded, enlarged part of the abdomen, down and away from the vent and as far from vital organs as we could deduce, with our knowledge of chicken anatomy. It's a tricky proposition if something is not where it should be in there and, as I said, not a cure for the condition.

    Breeder quality birds are not immune to these malfunctions, though they do seem to get them to a much lesser degree than hatchery stock. Right now, I have a beautiful huge Buff Orpington hen from a breeder (not a propagator who simply breeds from hatchery stock) who is probably dying from whatever is going on in her body. Just removed a blob of egg white from the nest yesterday. A couple of months ago, her abdomen was the size of a bowling ball, though it has subsided now. We did not drain her and we made that decision because we know how this always turns out in the end. Either her body will work it out or she will die and that's pretty much that.
     

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