Neglected, curled toenails

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Wisher1000, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. Wisher1000

    Wisher1000 Bama Biddy

    I have some new (to me) chickens that have terribly overgrown toenails. They are so bad that the toes can't straighten out. Some are corkscrewed and some circle back on themselves. I know the quick is long and that trimming them without bleeding will be a very long process. I wonder if I can cut one at a time back into the quick, treat for bleeding and let it heal a few days before doing another one. I know that it will hurt, but just for a second, and I can stop the bleeding with steptic powder. I could have all the nails on one bird back to normal in two months just doing one nail a week. If I trim 1/8th of an inch off every week or two, it will take a year or more.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,686
    2,625
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  3. Wisher1000

    Wisher1000 Bama Biddy

    [​IMG] This picture came from Feathersite and was submitted by Ilana Nilsen.

    My birds are not featherlegged, but this is very similar to the condition their feet and nails are in. I don't know how they were kept before I got them, but they are now being treated for scaley leg mites and I would love to get those nails back in shape, too.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    28,989
    2,988
    471
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Your veterinarian's office technician may be able to give some advice since I'm sure they see dogs with neglected nails a lot. I think they use a Dremel sanding tool sometimes also for trimming.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  5. Wisher1000

    Wisher1000 Bama Biddy

    Our small house dog cracked a dew claw nail a couple of weeks ago. It was split and bent at a 90o angle and catching on everything. She lay around licking it all the time until I finally took the dog nail clippers and in one quick motion, cut it off at the break. She yipped once. I quickly put a pinch of flour over it and wrapped it up in gauze. It never bled through the bandage and ten minutes later, she pulled it off. No blood, no licking, no limping, no problem. I am just wondering if I could do the bird's nails that way, one at a time, with a few days in between each cut.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by