New (currently quarantined) Chick Ceacal Poop?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by bluenow, Oct 9, 2018.

  1. bluenow

    bluenow Chirping

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    Inspection done, and I think they're good. Lots of dander/shed feather sheaths, but I dont think there's any lice.
    However, I saw this poop when I opened them up this morning, and it caught my eye. I believe based on pictures I've seen that this is shed intestinal lining, but can anyone confirm? IMG-0296.JPG

    Finally, I believe when I was reading about mites I read that they leave black marks on the feathers. I have seen no evidence of mites, but there are black spots on the tail feathers of one of them. Only on the tail feathers, nowhere else. Normal?
    IMG-0294.JPG
    Thanks to everyone for the help!
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    The black on the feathers looks like it's normal coloring. Do you know what breed she is?

    The poop...it probably is intestinal shedding, but I think if I saw that much I would treat for Coccidiosis since they are new to the property.
    Can you get some Corid?
     
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  3. bluenow

    bluenow Chirping

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    I'm not seeing any other symptoms of Coccidiosis. She's running around, digging, and eating like normal. Is there any reason to think that it's not just shed lining?
     
  4. Helloworld

    Helloworld Songster

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    Normal poop. Young chicks I see go through this. I notice a difference for the better by slightly wetting crumble to brown sugar like consistency because it is a little rough on their digestion at first meaning it scratches and may bleed a tiny bit until everything gets a little bigger inside. I see this between weeks 2-4 always. I also feed medicated so that is a little rough to get used to at first.
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    That is a lot of intestinal shedding. They are "new" to you and only been on your property for 3 weeks. While the infectious process of the oocysts can take as little as 4-7 day to multiply, these are bit older birds so they should have built resistance to at least one strain. There are several strains of Coccidia and they may have encounter a different one on your property.

    You can always take a wait and see approach. If they are active, eating/drinking,etc. then just keep watch on the droppings and their behavior.

    fwiw Most medicated feeds in the US contain Amprolium, which is a very mild coccidiostat, it should not be rough on the system. Wet or dry, crumbles, feed or even scratch should not cause any scratches or damage to the digestive system of a chick, there should absolutely be no bleeding from eating.

     
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  6. Helloworld

    Helloworld Songster

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  7. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    To each his own I suppose. If a just hatched chick can swallow grape nuts, it can also swallow some grit to process it:)
    Nope, there should be no shed blood. Intestinal shedding should be minimal at best and should always be questioned and monitored.
     
  8. bluenow

    bluenow Chirping

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    This is what they're eating. It's not crumble. Probably a bit harder on their stomach.
    IMG-0299.JPG
     
  9. bluenow

    bluenow Chirping

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    Oh, and they're red sexlinks
     
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  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Can you tell us what that is?
    Is it touted as a complete poultry feed or is it scratch grains?
     

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