New hen owner with question about routine worming

newchickmomma4

Songster
5 Years
Apr 11, 2014
207
10
118
California
Hi all, I have 4 two year old hens that are not currently laying (they are at varying degrees of a moult) and have never been wormed before. I was thinking that now is probably as good a time as any to start the twice a year worming routine (since they aren't currently laying). After doing a lot of reading here and in books, I am thinking that I will go with Safeguard (if anyone has other recommendations please let me know). My question is, by the time I get to the feed store this week I will have 1 week old chicks, so the next time I worm the flock they will be 6 months old and I'm hoping will be at the beginning of the egg laying process. Should I worm them at 6 months or can I wait until they are 1 year old (I am concerned about not being able to eat their eggs and differentiating between my established layers eggs and the pullets eggs). What would you do?
 

ChickenLegs13

Songster
6 Years
Sep 4, 2013
1,401
178
143
Lower Alabama
I have 2 old Buffs that haven't layed since mid Feb and as a last ditch resort before I whacked them I put them in a small pen and Wazined them several days ago. They didn't show any signs of worms but passed a lot of roundworms about 3" long. Even if they don't start laying again maybe they will fatten up some for the oven.
I worm the hen pen during the winter slowdown and whatever is in the grower pen gets it several times a year before they go to either the layer pen or the dinner table.
I live in a damp warm location and know my birds will have worms most of the year.
 

ChickensAreSweet

Heavenly Grains for Hens
9 Years
Jun 8, 2010
15,100
621
398
Pacific NW- where the Douglas Firs grow
Hi all, I have 4 two year old hens that are not currently laying (they are at varying degrees of a moult) and have never been wormed before. I was thinking that now is probably as good a time as any to start the twice a year worming routine (since they aren't currently laying). After doing a lot of reading here and in books, I am thinking that I will go with Safeguard (if anyone has other recommendations please let me know). My question is, by the time I get to the feed store this week I will have 1 week old chicks, so the next time I worm the flock they will be 6 months old and I'm hoping will be at the beginning of the egg laying process. Should I worm them at 6 months or can I wait until they are 1 year old (I am concerned about not being able to eat their eggs and differentiating between my established layers eggs and the pullets eggs). What would you do?
Be sure to research fenbendazole during molt on BYC. I have read posts that indicate that it should not be used during molt since it affects feather regrowth negatively (may cause strange feathering I believe I read).

I too have to worm twice a year, since I have worm problems here on our wet soil. But if I didn't have worm problems I would not worm them.

If you really need to deworm them since the worm eggs are in your soil already, I would not wait until they are one year old. I would do it right before they start laying, say at 5-6 months old. I have tried to wait until one year, only to find out that at about 6 months they were sick from worms. So you need to find out what is best for you. Many people never deworm, and others have to do it several times a year in order to keep the flock alive.

It is best to rotate wormers, also, to prevent resistance. And don't forget to repeat the worming (I do it at 10 days) to break the life cycle.

Favored wormers mentioned on BYC include albendazole (valbazen), of course Wazine for just roundworms, and fenbendazole (Safeguard). Here is a nice link:
http://en.aviagen.com/assets/Tech_Center/AA_Technical_Articles/AAServiceBulletinIntestinalWorms.pdf

Toss eggs too...I toss them for two weeks myself after each dose but this is something where you have to go with what you feel comfortable with. There is no guideline, as these wormers are NOT approved for egglaying hens. They are all off-label in egglaying hens.
 

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