new layers-tiny eggs.. how many of you eat them????

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Jkioneil, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. Jkioneil

    Jkioneil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    my girls are about to lay... i hope... waiting patiently...[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] i have noticed that the firs eggs people tend to get are really small... like pigeon eggs. how long does this last and how many of you eat them? my husband says it is weird and he won't eat em. i am so excited about them laying i will eat them all!!! [​IMG] can you tell me if you eat them and how long they lay like that thanks![​IMG]
     
  2. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    They small eggs last a couple of days at the most. I don't know why you would eat them. They taste like eggs.
     
  3. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I eat the first eggs, scrambled, because I blow out the first egg to preserve the shell. I usually wait until I have 3 eggs because I REALLY LIKE scrambled eggs....

    Usually, within a week or so the eggs are larger than the first one or two. And each season, they get bigger, too.
     
  4. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    Oh and the girls don't care if you eat them. If for what ever reason you can't bring yourself to eat the egg, then just cook it up the girls will be happy to eat it. It will still taste like egg, only fresher. [​IMG]
     
  5. TheBeatlesAddict

    TheBeatlesAddict Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:how do you blow out the egg?
     
  6. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First put some bread--preferably whole grain--in the toaster and start it toasting. Then take a frying pan, heat it to medium high, melt some butter (use the real stuff oleo is actually poison) break half a dozen of those pullet eggs into the pan--note the orange yolks and how high they sit above the whites--fry until the whites are solid. Slide them off onto a plate, butter the toast and slather on some homemade jam. Wash down with a cup of freshly brewed coffee. If that doesn't satisfy you, repeat. There will be more eggs tomorrow. Enjoy and be very glad your husband won't join you as that makes more eggs for you.[​IMG]
     
  7. chics in the sun

    chics in the sun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I made a very tasty quiche with some of my pullet eggs. The recipe called for four eggs, so I used six pullet eggs. I am surprised at how long mine have been laying the mini eggs, though. It has been over two weeks, and all I get from all three girls (a Barred Rock, Leghorn, and Prodcution Red) are munchkin size eggs. Maybe it's the heat. My Barred Rock has layed just soft-shell ones two days in a row now - the one today just looked like a yolk on the ground. But a full sized one!
     
  8. Boo-Boo's Mama

    Boo-Boo's Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes, we eat them! Taste great...may take 3 to make a serving but that is ok. [​IMG]
     
  9. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I eat them!

    They can take anywhere from 2 weeks to 3 months to reach "full size" and even then, the jumbos are often not till the second year of laying. Of course, if you don't have a breed known for egg laying abilities, they may never be larger than "medium".

    My fat bottom standard cochin mutt never laid larger than medium, while my 3 lb skinny rail of a leghorn popped out larger than jumbo eggs from who knows where daily.
     
  10. Tala

    Tala Flock Mistress

    Quote:[​IMG] but it's true. Some of my younger layers lay as big as the year-olds, must be the genetics. Course I have one new layer who has been popping out pullet eggs for a couple weeks now with no size improvement. Give it time, she'll catch up.
    We use the smaller eggs for scrambling and such, where size doesnt' matter ya just have to cook more of em. We stick to the larger ones for recipes based on "grade A large" that call for a "certainn amount" if ya know what I mean.
     

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