New to this chicken sexing thing...

Rowsdower

Songster
7 Years
May 27, 2012
771
55
131
I've posed this question elsewhere and got replies ranging from "definitely a rooster" to "definitely a hen" and everything in between. She/he is a bit more feathered now so I thought I might solicit your advice again. My best guess on age for this one is about 7 weeks. What d'ya think, boy or girl?



 

Pele

Songster
8 Years
Feb 25, 2011
4,392
133
243
Boise
completely black or white birds are notoriously hard to gender ID. In my personal experience, that much comb development in a mere 7 week old is indicative of a roo. Hens usually don't even think about getting red combs until they are near laying eggs, around 20 weeks.
 

Rowsdower

Songster
7 Years
May 27, 2012
771
55
131
Yeah, maybe it is wishful thinking. I think I am thrown off that she isn't crowing yet like the other cockerels and her behavior is much more like that of the pullet. Her comb is not nearly as red as the other cockerels, either. Thanks all, I guess it's just back to waiting, eh?
 

Rowsdower

Songster
7 Years
May 27, 2012
771
55
131
Here is a pic of my roo for comparison (and just because I love him).

 

speckledhen

Intentional Solitude
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Feb 3, 2007
78,797
12,636
936
Blue Ridge Mtns. of North Georgia
Most are not crowing by 7 weeks old, though they can start at any time. I've had them start as early as 4 DAYS old and as late as 25 weeks old, but most seem to start from 10-15 weeks of age.
 

Rowsdower

Songster
7 Years
May 27, 2012
771
55
131
The preschool teacher who gave me the chickies called today. She needed to find a home for the two remaining chicks that she had. The rest of her flock was tragically eaten by her labrador. She brought them to me and wouldn't you know, I think they are both cockerels. :/ So, out of a straight-run hatch of 10 eggs, I have one pullet (I think). Is this unusual? I have read how the temperature during incubation can effect sex. I asked the teacher about the incubator and she said that it was kept at roughly 100 degrees(she could not adjust it). I would think that if temperature effected sex so drastically that there would be far fewer culls at the hatcheries. Anyone have experience with this? Tbh, I am not even sure what I am asking. Just, maybe someone could explain it to me a little better?

ETA: After a bit more reading, it would seem that the temperature thing is an oft-repeated myth, my apologies. Sooooo...I guess my question is, anyone else experience such a large abundance of cockerels in a clutch?
 
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AhyokaAcres

Chirping
7 Years
Mar 29, 2012
158
4
93
North Carolina
My bantams roos were 4 out of 6, and its now looking like my other ten chicks are 9 out of 10. Gave away all but the 4 "pullets"....now 3 of those are looking "rooish"
 

Rowsdower

Songster
7 Years
May 27, 2012
771
55
131
Okay, I think I might actually be getting this. Is this what I am looking for?

 

Pele

Songster
8 Years
Feb 25, 2011
4,392
133
243
Boise
The preschool teacher who gave me the chickies called today. She needed to find a home for the two remaining chicks that she had. The rest of her flock was tragically eaten by her labrador. She brought them to me and wouldn't you know, I think they are both cockerels. :/ So, out of a straight-run hatch of 10 eggs, I have one pullet (I think). Is this unusual? I have read how the temperature during incubation can effect sex. I asked the teacher about the incubator and she said that it was kept at roughly 100 degrees(she could not adjust it). I would think that if temperature effected sex so drastically that there would be far fewer culls at the hatcheries. Anyone have experience with this? Tbh, I am not even sure what I am asking. Just, maybe someone could explain it to me a little better?

ETA: After a bit more reading, it would seem that the temperature thing is an oft-repeated myth, my apologies. Sooooo...I guess my question is, anyone else experience such a large abundance of cockerels in a clutch?
Yes, it's a myth based off of reptillian hatching. If chickens were alligators or turtles, then temperature would matter a great deal with gender. Unfortunately for the poultry industry, it's entirely genetic when it comes to birds.

As far as why you got so many males, I think it has more to do with 'inverse beginner's luck'. A lot of people who try to start with chickens seem to end up with roos. It happened to me. Fate is strange. At one point I challenged my friend to prove that female barred cochins exist after trying 3 times and ending up with 8 roos :p. She got one on her first try. Ack!
 

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