No, I don’t have any regrets about eating animals.

ShannonR

Crowing
Sep 17, 2015
1,570
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You know Shannon you reminded me of something that turned up in my reading about food, farming and health etc...I read constantly and don't take official notes but I did run across at least one study that found high rates of mental illness, possibly higher rates of suicide among vegetarians. Things like that I tend to remember! lol I have no problem with trying to eat less factory farmed meat but nobody likes proselytizing whether it's religious, dietary or politics.
I believe I linked to a study from Psychology Today a couple pages back that shows a correlation between vegetarianism/veganism and high incidence of psychological issues.
 

igorsMistress

In the middle
Premium member
6 Years
Apr 9, 2013
13,755
65,101
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My Coop
My Coop
I curious, what advantages do quail provide? I don’t know anyone who keeps them. When I was a toddler my dad used to apply birdshot to wild ones in the front yard. But that was 40 years ago.
Quail reach maturity very quickly. They can start producing eggs at 9 weeks, so they reach butchering age very quickly. As a result you can hatch and have a meal in about 12 weeks.

I didn't like the cost of lives per meal so I quit keeping them.
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
3,416
7,313
517
Western Ohio
Quail reach maturity very quickly. They can start producing eggs at 9 weeks, so they reach butchering age very quickly. As a result you can hatch and have a meal in about 12 weeks.

I didn't like the cost of lives per meal so I quit keeping them.
coturnix quail (Japanese quail) are typically raised for eggs and meat, although there are other choices too. Our Coturnix would start to lay eggs as early as 5.5 weeks, and all were laying by 9 weeks. We could butcher excess males as young as 6 weeks. If you don’t want to pluck, you can just slip them out of their skins. They are quick to butcher. We raised them, but stopped bc we needed to address the messy feed, combined with dropping trays caused large fly populations. We couldn’t spend the time to optimize that setup, so we stopped raising them. But, they were good for meat and eggs and for small spaces.
 

igorsMistress

In the middle
Premium member
6 Years
Apr 9, 2013
13,755
65,101
1,322
My Coop
My Coop
coturnix quail (Japanese quail) are typically raised for eggs and meat, although there are other choices too. Our Coturnix would start to lay eggs as early as 5.5 weeks, and all were laying by 9 weeks. We could butcher excess males as young as 6 weeks. If you don’t want to pluck, you can just slip them out of their skins. They are quick to butcher. We raised them, but stopped bc we needed to address the messy feed, combined with dropping trays caused large fly populations. We couldn’t spend the time to optimize that setup, so we stopped raising them. But, they were good for meat and eggs and for small spaces.
I kept mine in an aviary/garden setup which was ideal for me. They were fun, but the smell was just too much and I'd get hives after cleaning their space or handling them.
 

Coopscraft

Songster
Jul 6, 2019
170
420
106
Willamette Valley, Oregon, USA
I have been keeping chickens and ducks now since about March, 2019. For me they are the ideal livestock in my limited space. From what you say, chickens work better for me. Ducks can also be super stinky in confined space. It helps to have more chickens than ducks and continually add carbon. The chickens keep the duck refuse from building up on the surface. And they are so good to eat.
 
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