Nutrena All Flock Vs Layena?

TropicalBabies

Free Ranging
Jun 12, 2018
1,970
8,858
607
Kauai, Hawaii
I just switched to the nutrena all flock 20% my last buy, from I think, a Purina organic layer feed that I had thought was a flock keeper (asked store for a keeper and did not check the label. my bad). For the last three weeks I have had no problems with laying or shell thickness. All exactly the same. I keep oyster shell on the side and actually caught one of my hens eating eggshell out of the compost in my garden bed. Hmmm.
 

Kat2141

Songster
Jul 25, 2018
281
653
182
Windsor, NY
I just switched to the Nutrena All Flock a week ago because I have 11 that are 16 weeks (6 pullets, 5 cockerels) and 4 hens that are a year and a half. They were all eating the grower and I wanted to switch to a pellet. They all seem to like it. I have oyster shell on the side and I give the hens the dried and crushed egg shells from the eggs we use. So far, so good.
 

Timothy Menezes

Songster
Nov 27, 2017
548
677
201
Monterey, California
I should explain, while most birds can regulate and do just fine on a low calcium diet with calcium (oyster shells) on the side, some do not. I had one year where my mixed flock was horrible about thin shells, and even had some shelless eggs. Looking back I wonder if it was the brand of feed as it was a local local grain mill. So I feel your pain with the thin shelled eggs.

Had to butcher that flock as they all started eating each other's eggs the moment they were laid. I get that lots of people have success just doing calcium on the side, but I never wanna go through that again so all my laying flocks will always have at least 3% percent calcium feed, plus additional oyster shell on the side. I also do not use that grain Mills feeds anymore.
 

MilesFluffybutt

Songster
Nov 16, 2016
527
891
211
Vermont
I switched from a layer feed to All Flock with oyster shell on the side been and I hadn't noticed a difference in their shell quality. Right now, I'm NatureWise Feather Fixer to help with their molt, and it's been great. I may keep them on it - maybe, mix it with their All Flock.
 

oldrooster

One Crazy Nut
9 Years
Feb 19, 2012
4,280
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monroe county indiana
My Coop
My Coop
I should explain, while most birds can regulate and do just fine on a low calcium diet with calcium (oyster shells) on the side, some do not.
I get that lots of people have success just doing calcium on the side,

I wonder if it has to do with the girls themselves (habits and genetic make up) OR if it has something to do with having supplements available from day one (either grit or oyster shell or both). it might be a combination of all these factors. I wonder if started from day one with supplements on the side since they are cheap if it would make a difference on what is feed....
 

Timothy Menezes

Songster
Nov 27, 2017
548
677
201
Monterey, California
I don't know, but as someone who tried everything and ended up having to slaughter that flock I can tell you I will never feed a laying hen a food that does not contain at least 3% calcium. Those that say they don't do this because #1 it's not great for the rooster, and #2 they want more protein.

Well for #1 I would say it has never harmed my rooster or anybody else's rooster that I have ever heard of. Plus my flocks are all about the girls and their health is most important. Honestly most roosters are far more likely to be killed by a preditor or replaced to keep a balanced Gene pool long before this comes into play. And if he is a free ranger it likely never will as my roosters eat bugs/vegetables so rarely even sample the layer feed.

#2 Purina game bird Layer has 20% protein if thats what you wanna run but also has 3% calcium. This is a food I plan on testing at some point as a local feed store carries a ton of it.

But consider this, there is a trend in modern society to focus very heavily on protein. I don't think it's a good idea to run high levels of protein. Keep in mind a can of tuna is 20% protein.

I believe a far bigger health issue to think about is that chickens and ducks are omnivores like us, and need some animal fats and proteins to be healthy. Feed manufacturers have removed all animal products from the feed and replaced them with soy. Soy is unavailable as a digestible nutritional support if it has been heat treated, cooked, or possibly best option, fermented.

Cheapest way I have found to add good healthy fats / animal proteins is a quality cat food. Also excellent but more expensive is a game fish food, like the kind used at a fish hatchery.
 

oldrooster

One Crazy Nut
9 Years
Feb 19, 2012
4,280
4,162
417
monroe county indiana
My Coop
My Coop
Tim, I agree with you on point #1 that it is likely only going to hurt a rooster if it used in a long term breeding program (therefore in a contained environment no predators around) or is a long term pet. but on the cat food issue that brings me back to my point of offering grit and oyster shell separate and all the time you can buy regular bird seed also and feed it to hens at that point no problem....
 

MANNA-PRO

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