Nutridrench, how long?

FeatherTay

Crowing
Jun 28, 2020
1,757
2,820
256
Kansas
I have a 6 week old splash cochin who has never been “right.” Her eye is always squinty but it doesn’t seem to both her. She was my only splash cochin pullet out of 4. So when I noticed she has bright green poop, I kinda freaked. Last time a cochin had bright green poop, he died. He was a 6 month old, the one who died! I immediately quarantined Dumplin’ (her name) and made her comfortable. I calculated how much nutri drench I should give her and I have been giving her it for a few days. Today is day 4. Her poop isn’t bright green anymore, it’s mostly brown with a tint of dark green. She is eating and drinking on her own. She acts pretty normal, and when I let her out to have fresh air, she was walking around
pecking at the ground.
Like I said she’s never been as energetic as all of the other birds. She seems normal to me know, except maybe a bit of dark green tinge to her poo.
So should today be her last day with nutridrench?
Also, when can she go back with her flock?
 

azygous

Enabler
12 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,965
39,997
1,182
Colorado Rockies
Yes, since her behavior has returned to normal and she's eating (her poop confirms this), you can stop the Nutri-drench and return her.

In future, if you see no symptoms of respiratory disease, there is no need to isolate a sick chicken away from the flock. It benefits a sick chicken more to segregate them within view of their mates in the event they are weak and may get picked on during the time they need to be treated. This goes for injuries as well as illness.

Many of us have a sectioned off portion in our runs or coops to protect a sick or injured chicken or even to temporarily segregate a problem chicken. Segregating a chicken away and out of sight of their flock can create more problems in the long run than it solves short term. About the only time I bring a sick chicken indoors to treat is when I have to observe their behavior, food intake and poop very closely in order to treat them.
 

FeatherTay

Crowing
Jun 28, 2020
1,757
2,820
256
Kansas
Yes, since her behavior has returned to normal and she's eating (her poop confirms this), you can stop the Nutri-drench and return her.

In future, if you see no symptoms of respiratory disease, there is no need to isolate a sick chicken away from the flock. It benefits a sick chicken more to segregate them within view of their mates in the event they are weak and may get picked on during the time they need to be treated. This goes for injuries as well as illness.

Many of us have a sectioned off portion in our runs or coops to protect a sick or injured chicken or even to temporarily segregate a problem chicken. Segregating a chicken away and out of sight of their flock can create more problems in the long run than it solves short term. About the only time I bring a sick chicken indoors to treat is when I have to observe their behavior, food intake and poop very closely in order to treat them.
Ok, I did read that green poop sometimes meant respiratory disease? Maybe I’m wrong?
Also she wasn’t all along and in the house, she was in a separate cage in my brooder. She has neighbors next door, and the neighbors sure like to talk! 😂 Thank you for the advice, I’ll make sure not to separate in the future.
 

hugene

Chirping
Apr 8, 2021
49
123
66
Austin, TX
I have a 6 week old splash cochin who has never been “right.” Her eye is always squinty but it doesn’t seem to both her. She was my only splash cochin pullet out of 4. So when I noticed she has bright green poop, I kinda freaked. Last time a cochin had bright green poop, he died. He was a 6 month old, the one who died! I immediately quarantined Dumplin’ (her name) and made her comfortable. I calculated how much nutri drench I should give her and I have been giving her it for a few days. Today is day 4. Her poop isn’t bright green anymore, it’s mostly brown with a tint of dark green. She is eating and drinking on her own. She acts pretty normal, and when I let her out to have fresh air, she was walking around
pecking at the ground.
Like I said she’s never been as energetic as all of the other birds. She seems normal to me know, except maybe a bit of dark green tinge to her poo.
So should today be her last day with nutridrench?
Also, when can she go back with her flock?
I fed one of my limpy leg chicken 1ml of ND today. Did you do the direct feed four times in a row each day? I wasn't sure how often I should do. How many times did you end up direct feeding ND? And how is the chicken doing?
 

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Sep 20, 2015
41,680
60,971
1,412
Southern N.C. Mountains
I fed one of my limpy leg chicken 1ml of ND today. Did you do the direct feed four times in a row each day? I wasn't sure how often I should do. How many times did you end up direct feeding ND? And how is the chicken doing?
Direct dose of PND is 1ml per 3 pounds of weight given orally once a day.
Personally, I would not direct dose for more than 3-4 days in a row. Vitamins are to be used for short rapid response.
What is wrong with your limpy chicken? If you are looking to get B2(Riboflavin) into her to help with a leg issue, then PND is not your go to. It does not contain B2. Give her 1/4 tablet human B-Complex once a day for 5 days instead.

1638419367138.jpeg
 

hugene

Chirping
Apr 8, 2021
49
123
66
Austin, TX
Direct dose of PND is 1ml per 3 pounds of weight given orally once a day.
Personally, I would not direct dose for more than 3-4 days in a row. Vitamins are to be used for short rapid response.
What is wrong with your limpy chicken? If you are looking to get B2(Riboflavin) into her to help with a leg issue, then PND is not your go to. It does not contain B2. Give her 1/4 tablet human B-Complex once a day for 5 days instead.

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Hi @Wyorp Rock , thanks for the response! Okay I will dose for couple more days (wasn't sure if that was okay). And THANK YOU for telling me that the ND won't help with the leg issue.. I will buy b complex supplement today and crush and directly feed the chicken (mixed with water or something with a syringe).
 

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Sep 20, 2015
41,680
60,971
1,412
Southern N.C. Mountains
Hi @Wyorp Rock , thanks for the response! Okay I will dose for couple more days (wasn't sure if that was okay). And THANK YOU for telling me that the ND won't help with the leg issue.. I will buy b complex supplement today and crush and directly feed the chicken (mixed with water or something with a syringe).
Depending on the age of the bird, you can just pop the piece of tablet directly into the beak and let them swallow it.
 

hugene

Chirping
Apr 8, 2021
49
123
66
Austin, TX
Depending on the age of the bird, you can just pop the piece of tablet directly into the beak and let them swallow it.
Hi one more question.

I see a lot of b complex comes with other additional supplements/ingredients.

This is the purest form i found. Is this okay?
 

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