Darren Leonard

In the Brooder
Nov 11, 2018
13
18
36
Ireland
So today I went to a poultry fare for the second time and decided to buy a rooster and more hens. I currently have 9 hens and a rooster. The guy said the rooster would be mature enough for breeding after Christmas. I came home and introduced him to my existing 6 hens and he was shivering and the most dominant hen and a few of the others stood up to him and he ran away.

I'm not to sure if h s even a light Sussex rooster because I was looking at pictures and my rooster is real high of the ground, has a few streaks of brown on his neck and is sort of skinny and not a square build. It is late right now so I'll put up some pictures tomorrow morning. Thanks
 

Darren Leonard

In the Brooder
Nov 11, 2018
13
18
36
Ireland
Partition him off in his own space so he's not being chased about while he gets his wits about him and gets used to his new home. Otherwise you risk starting off bad. Let him gain some confidence first.
What about at night time? Will he sleep in with them? In a few days I'll have another coop ready and I'll just keep him in there. Will that be to late?
 

oldhenlikesdogs

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Jul 16, 2015
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What about at night time? Will he sleep in with them? In a few days I'll have another coop ready and I'll just keep him in there. Will that be to late?
If he adjusts quickly he could. Otherwise just let him run away if you aren't interested in separating him temporarily. As long as he isn't being bullied and corner it will work out. Did you remove your original rooster too? Or am I reading that wrong and you only have this rooster?

Generally when you bring in New poultry, especially older ones from swaps and sales you should quarantine them away from your original birds. Sounds like you tried to just add the male? Where are the hens he came with?
 

Darren Leonard

In the Brooder
Nov 11, 2018
13
18
36
Ireland
If he adjusts quickly he could. Otherwise just let him run away if you aren't interested in separating him temporarily. As long as he isn't being bullied and corner it will work out. Did you remove your original rooster too? Or am I reading that wrong and you only have this rooster?

Generally when you bring in New poultry, especially older ones from swaps and sales you should quarantine them away from your original birds. Sounds like you tried to just add the male? Where are the hens he came with?
I originally had 6 hens but today I bought 3 extra hens. The rooster I bought separate from a different person. My six original hens I've only had for 4 weeks. This is my first rooster. I just added him and the 3 new hens to the flock when I got home
 

Sneebsey

Songster
Apr 7, 2017
803
1,433
236
Shropshire, UK
I agree with @oldhenlikesdogs that he ought really to have been penned separately for a time. He will not be able to gain a place in the flock, much less lead it, until he has matured; grown hens have little time for teenage boys. Also a factor is the risk to your existing flock; I personally only bring in hatching eggs, but for bringing in live birds, a quarantine period of at least a few weeks is advised, to observe their health before introducing them to your current stock.

How old is he? If the breeder considers him to be mature after Christmas, I am taking it to mean that his female hatch-mates will be laying pullets by then, which would place him at around 16 weeks?

I have found that many birds will appear skinny while growing, but will have a frame there to build upon once they are mature. A nice wide back and low carriage are good dual purpose traits to watch for.

If you could post some pictures of him, we can assess his form and colour, as you request. The streaks of brown sound to me as an indicator that he is either impure for Silver or carrying Mahogany. A RSL cockerel can often appear similar in colour to a Light Sussex, and would express Mahogany.

Tanketal1.JPG

As you can see, my RSL cockerel (at left) shows mahogany in the wing. He also has yellow-toned hackle and sickle feathers, showing his impurity for Silver.
 

Darren Leonard

In the Brooder
Nov 11, 2018
13
18
36
Ireland
I agree with @oldhenlikesdogs that he ought really to have been penned separately for a time. He will not be able to gain a place in the flock, much less lead it, until he has matured; grown hens have little time for teenage boys. Also a factor is the risk to your existing flock; I personally only bring in hatching eggs, but for bringing in live birds, a quarantine period of at least a few weeks is advised, to observe their health before introducing them to your current stock.

How old is he? If the breeder considers him to be mature after Christmas, I am taking it to mean that his female hatch-mates will be laying pullets by then, which would place him at around 16 weeks?

I have found that many birds will appear skinny while growing, but will have a frame there to build upon once they are mature. A nice wide back and low carriage are good dual purpose traits to watch for.

If you could post some pictures of him, we can assess his form and colour, as you request. The streaks of brown sound to me as an indicator that he is either impure for Silver or carrying Mahogany. A RSL cockerel can often appear similar in colour to a Light Sussex, and would express Mahogany.

View attachment 1587273
As you can see, my RSL cockerel (at left) shows mahogany in the wing. He also has yellow-toned hackle and sickle feathers, showing his impurity for Silver.
Would a 4x4' brooder box thingy be fine? Will I put the 3 new hens in with him aswell? Or will I put a divider?
 
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