Official BYC Poll: How do you keep your flock warm in the winter?

How do you keep your flock warm in the winter?

  • I've Insulated Their Coop

    Votes: 76 26.7%
  • I use the Deep Litter Method

    Votes: 79 27.7%
  • I use Heat Lamps

    Votes: 24 8.4%
  • I provide lots of draft-free ventilation

    Votes: 137 48.1%
  • I use Sweeter Heaters

    Votes: 5 1.8%
  • I use Plate Heaters

    Votes: 11 3.9%
  • Nothing, their feathers keep them warm

    Votes: 159 55.8%
  • Other (please elaborate in a reply below)

    Votes: 35 12.3%

  • Total voters
    285

BYC Project Manager

Moderator
BYC Staff
Project Manager
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Feb 22, 2009
885
4,899
451
Every year the winter season presents a lot of challenges for the backyard chicken keeper. So we would like to find out how you keep your girls happy, healthy, and comfortable as the outside temperatures plummet and the winter weather rages.

How do you keep your flock warm in the winter? Place your vote above.

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(Check out more Official BYC Polls HERE!)
 

Duckee

Crowing
6 Years
Jun 11, 2014
845
1,049
251
Southern Illinois
I do not heat or insulate in winter. I only worry about keeping the flock out of direct direct cold air.
Due to an increase in flock: This year i went from a great 2 story wood coop that had run on ground level and roosts & boxes on 2nd floor. With a larger roofed exterior run. Poop and food mess in coop was never a major issue because they only laid eggs and slept in there. Now I have a large covered hoop coop with unroofed exterior run. Wow has my work load increased!
Now I fight coop heat/cold, humidity and ammonia, and preditors in outside run! I found proper ventilation is vital now! In the summer the coop cover sides will be rolled up and this first winter sides down with bottom half of large front and back doors uncovered for airflow. The roosts are set high & back away from doors.
I built the new coop over part of the deep bed large run. That proved to create too much ammonia. So i leveled the floor, lined it with chicken wire, then added sand. Every morning I let the flock out, collect eggs, food & water, then scoop poop ( i wear a mask). This is working ok so far, but is way more work. I may have to go back to a smaller flock and reopen the wood coop :(

I would love to hear safer, cheaper better ways to keep a flock in a hoop coop, if there is any.
 

Chickassan

Wattle Fondler
May 23, 2017
15,570
78,143
1,327
Greenville S.C, formerly Noneya U.S.A
I just have a good coop with good cross ventilation.
Both sections of my coop are also raised off the ground so that helps.
The winters in South Carolina don't normally get too brutal though, there might be a few weeks of teens in the mornings but rarely do we see days where it stays below freezing all day.:)
 

FlightyChicken

🦃 Turkey Obsessed 🦃
Premium Feather Member
Nov 18, 2020
151
565
146
Kitsap County, WA
I just have a good coop with good cross ventilation.
Both sections of my coop are also raised off the ground so that helps.
The winters in South Carolina don't normally get too brutal though, there might be a few weeks of teens in the mornings but rarely do we see days where it stays below freezing all day.:)
Your signature is the best!
 

3KillerBs

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Jul 10, 2009
9,812
24,537
986
North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
I just have a good coop with good cross ventilation.
Both sections of my coop are also raised off the ground so that helps.
The winters in South Carolina don't normally get too brutal though, there might be a few weeks of teens in the mornings but rarely do we see days where it stays below freezing all day.:)

Now that we've had our first frost I'm thinking I'll get 5-6 straw bales to make a wind baffle since the pen is pretty open to the northeast side (for those unfamiliar with the Carolinas, we get storms from any and every direction -- sometimes in the same week).
 

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