Oh no...Guineas eating chicken eggs

southwind00

Chirping
Jul 29, 2018
42
42
54
Western New York
Since I've had Guineas I've noticed a decrease in ticks in my yard area and though I credit some of it to them eating them, I also know that it takes awhile for them to learn where and when to find them. Another way that Guineas keep ticks away is keeping the mouse population down and though I have never seen my guineas harassing or chasing mice, I have noticed a steep drop in the mouse population in my house garage and other out buildings, mainly by observing very little mouse poo where it is usually quite heavy, like around the bird seed cans and our sugarhouse. I throw them some millet and scratch around to just keep them around in the colder weather when there is not much out there except some grasses and stuff to browse on. If I don't they tend to wander way to far for my liking looking for things to eat. Everybody has there own ways with these birds and it is taking me some time to figure out how to keep most of them alive with out constantly spending my time herding and chasing them around.
https://entomologytoday.org/2015/03/30/understanding-the-complex-life-cycle-of-the-blacklegged-tick-to-combat-lyme-disease/
 

mkeawsh

Woody Hollow
Premium member
12 Years
Sep 23, 2007
457
107
221
Beaufort, MO
I give them more grain in the Winter than any other time. Foraging is much harder and they venture further into the woods but always come back. I've never had to encourage them to come back. Our mouse population is down because of slider snakes, black snakes and copperheads.
 

Phisch

Chirping
Oct 3, 2018
64
39
71
Ours were raised in the chicken coop to help them remember where they’re supposed to to to sleep. As a result, they’re not the best foragers. They eat what the chickens eat and one of them chases away what the top chicken chase away: the youngest pullet and three cockerels. That pullet is a tiny thing as a result. I’m not sure how to reach them not to stay around the chickens.
 

mkeawsh

Woody Hollow
Premium member
12 Years
Sep 23, 2007
457
107
221
Beaufort, MO
Because they were raised with chickens, they see the chickens as guineas. Guineas are a lot more aggressive as a breed and that is fine if it's guineas they are associating but chickens are milder and weaker, so the guineas will rule the roost and the chickens will suffer. No turning back unless you keep the chickens caged or the guineas in a separate pen.
 

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