Ok, about a month ago I thought a chicken got hurt and was limping...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by missnu01, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Couple problems, right off the bat ...

    First? Although I realize what one has will most probably be transferred by those managing/visiting the birds, it's almost guaranteed when you just put 'em all together. And, if you're goin' where other birds are? You're gonna suffer through many diseases, 'til you either run out of birds, or be most careful.

    Second? If the affected birds are joining the free-ranging chickens, then you've no control over how much exposure they have to toxins, such as they would get from botulism, or from aflatoxins, or from algae, etc. I'm a big fan of lettin' birds be birds, but they've gotta develop some level of tolerance ... some breeds are more sensitive than others, although that's based upon my own anecdotal evidence, but -- as little as four maggots can carry enough of the toxins produced by botulism to kill some adult birds.

    If you're feeding DuMor, by the way ... there's been a bunch of it recalled; some for aflatoxins, others for containing no vitamin D. Although Cargill, who was producing it, claims they 'voluntarily recalled' these feeds? They didn't do a thing, 'til the USDA caught 'em red-handed w/ the bad corn.

    From what you've said earlier, in another post ... the curled toes, and walkin' on 'em? Still sounds like riboflavin might be worth a try, as it's quick to correct, unless damage has already been done to the sciatic nerve.

    From: http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/206930.htm

    Changes in the sciatic nerves produce “curled-toe” paralysis in growing chickens.

    Deficient chicks are reluctant to move unless forced and then frequently walk on their hocks with the aid of their wings.

    Chicks receiving diets only partially deficient in riboflavin may recover spontaneously, indicating that the requirement rapidly decreases with age. A 100-µg dose should be sufficient for treatment of riboflavin-deficient chicks, followed by incorporation of an adequate level in the diet. However, when the curled-toe deformity is longstanding, irreparable damage has occurred in the sciatic nerve, and the administration of riboflavin is no longer curative.
     
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  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    I had one that did that, too.
     
  3. juliachick

    juliachick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm also willing to bet it is Merck's. We have had several out brakes (after fairs usually) and every time all the positive chickens had different symptoms. Some limp, some throw up, some won't eat or drink. One even lost use of its right wing. If the are Mareks, cull them. Like, right away. I hope i help.
     
  4. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A rather disturbing fact about the availability of Riboflavin (vitamin B2), or ... as it seems ... the likelihood that it's not available:

    Source: http://www.dsm.com/en_US/html/dnpna/anh_poul_vit_b2_fort.htm

    Poultry: Riboflavin
    Fortification Considerations

    Riboflavin is one of the vitamins most likely to be deficient for poultry. Riboflavin fortification levels should be adjusted, especially to offset the reduction or exclusion of riboflavin-rich ingredients such as milk fermentation and fish by-products and dehydrated alfalfa from computerized least-cost poultry formulations. Poultry diets based on grains and plant protein sources are often borderline to deficient in riboflavin. Only a few feedstuffs fed to poultry contain enough riboflavin to contribute to the requirements for growth and reproduction. Poultry in confinement become more dependent on adequate vitamin (including riboflavin) and trace mineral supplementation as least-cost feed formulation (i.e., using principally corn and soybean meal) limits the number of riboflavin-rich feed ingredients (such as milk by-products, fermentation products, fish by-products and dehydrated alfalfa). The greater the variety of feed ingredients, the lower the chance of vitamin and trace element deficiencies for animals and humans alike.
     
  5. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 16, 2012
    So what would a person give to a chicken to help them get more riboflavin?
    When the first chick started limping we separated it, more for the health of the limper, than as a precaution for the other chickens. I am not going to separate the latest limper, just because it did no good with the first. Hopefully they are just accident prone chickens...but I will gladly give the chickens some extra riboflavin if that might help.

    I find that my chickens don't seem to like very many greens, they won't eat lettuce or cabbage or spinach, unless they are cooked...I have never cooked lettuce, but they like cooked spinach and cabbage...They enjoy pumpkin, they really like anything made of bread. They like apples.

    Anyway imma look up foods high in riboflavin just in case that is it.

    As for marek's if it manifests so differently then what are the odds that both birds have the same type issue, but on different feet with no other symptoms. First bird right foot, new limper limps on the left.

    No paralysis...No jerky movements, no falling, no wheezing, no gasping, no issues at all other than curling up their toes for a month...

    Liver and soybeans are both high in B2...
     
  6. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All of the B vitamins are water soluble, so the body doesn't store 'em, and they're easily lost in the water foods are soaked or boiled in ... it might be best to just pick up a bottle of riboflavin as a supplement. For sure, you've gotta be sure the foods offered are otherwise OK for your chickens to eat ...

    The best sources of riboflavin include brewer's yeast, almonds, organ meats, whole grains, wheat germ, wild rice, mushrooms, soybeans, milk, yogurt, eggs, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and spinach. Flours and cereals are often fortified with riboflavin.
    Riboflavin is destroyed by light, so food should be stored away from light to protect its riboflavin content. While riboflavin is not destroyed by heat, it can be lost in water when foods are boiled or soaked. During cooking, roasting, and steaming preserves more riboflavin than frying or scalding.

    Source: http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/vitamin-b2-000334.htm
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    I'm no expert, but maybe the same reason some of mine are only showing symptoms in their eyes.
     
  8. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was already questioning my wisdom in having guineas, as they've proven only marginally more intelligent than the bugs they're intended to eat, but when someone as skilled and knowledgeable about poultry as you are suffers so many diseases? It makes me realize I'da been better off stickin' to animals ... but, since I'm apparently only a bit smarter than my birds? I guess I'll stick w/ it ... really sorry to hear that Marek's has found your own.
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Thanks... I've had it in my flock for a long time, but it wasn't until this year that I started to see it in so many different ways. I guess it's possible that a more virulent strain came from the feed store on my shoes, the feed bags or my tires, but I guess I'll never know for sure.
     
  10. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I think I've had it unknowingly for 4 years. The first one had every classic symptom, and the vet said "EEE" . The next few just wasted away. Then one of my hens was found flailing on the ground. I treated her for a broken leg. I also had 10 six week old chicks in a separate pen. The hen started to do this peck at food with no aim, and I euthanized her. One of the chicks broke her leg and was doing this real slow pant. I treated her for a broken leg. Then another one broke her leg! That's when I knew what I had. I lost all the chicks and one mama silkie. I've had 2 since that only displayed an odd pupil. I have one now who was vaccinated for Marek's, but months later, she got paralysis. I just couldn't do the deed. So she lived in a box in the garage. Then she lived in my bedroom. I took naps with her. My hubby and me would practice her walking like you would a baby. She became normal and I've her about about 8 months now. Maybe the shot saved her. Maybe some resistance in chickens is saving them

    If they are limping and get better, I would just be counting my blessings. .
     

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