Old and Rare Breeds

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by saladin, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    I'm not a show person (yet) but I do believe in the SOP. Yes, a bird doesn't have to be Miss (or mister) Chicken of the Country, but one at least should adhere to the standard of the breed. If not, then what is it? A mutt? An unrecognized fowl? There is a difference between a Silver Laced hen and a Silver Laced Wyandotte. [​IMG] And that of course also goes for behavior - As said before, there's a definite difference between a Pumpkin "Fowl" and a Pumpkin Hulsey.

    Anyway, for those curious of Oriental Gamefowl tolerating the cold. . .


    Shamos in the snow and ice.

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    For the lurkers: [​IMG]

    Shamos, along with all other gamefowl, are naturally a heat-hardy breed, and with their hard feathering added in, it can make them prone to cold climates. Now, Shamos are actually the less likely of them to give into the cold though. They're of Japanese origin, and although we provided our first pair with heat lamps in their coop, they spend majority of the day out in the cold atmosphere of their free ranging environment. It does not get very cold here, but it rains a lot, and lately we've been getting some heavy frost and snow. They occasionally shiver, but the pullet has not stopped laying eggs, and neither have shown signs of weakness.

    I am really enjoying this breed and think a lot more people should widen themselves into a different variety of chicken such as American and Oriental Gamefowl. They are not for beginners and males will actually kill each other if together, but otherwise, gamefowl are indeed an ancient and rare chicken with a lot of natural instincts that thankfully have not been bred out. They do not make the "egg song" call after or before they've laid an egg, they are not as flighty or shy as a lot of other breeds, they're very broody and protective, and many of the breeds are also very adaptable.

    My pair here is very young, and still have a lot of filling out to do. They still have a lot of pounds to put on, a lot of muscle to build up, even some color to still grow in, and of course some height to reach. These Shamos are of the O-Shamo variety, meaning they're the larger version, reaching over 28 inches tall at full growth.
     
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  2. OSUman

    OSUman GO BUCKS

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    Quote:Very nice looking shamos Illia. Do you know how tall the male is? I have read that they can get over 35 inches is that true?
     
  3. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    It is true indeed, but not too common. I believe at 30 is a normal.

    My stag is only 25 inches tall, last I measured him. (a few weeks ago) He's got a lot ahead of him.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2011
  4. Schweiger

    Schweiger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have heard that the O shamo can get very tall. How long of a time frame does this occur? I would doubt they would reach 30+/- inches in a year....so full height in 2-3 years? Iwould also hazard a guess of one or two small clutches of eggs per year, say 5-6? with them being almost straight up and down birds iwould think they arent too good of broody hens?
     
  5. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would eventually like to have some of these. They are gorgeous! I saw some in person for the first time last weekend at a show and was intrigued. I love the way they stand and look you right in the eye!
    sharon


    Quote:
     
  6. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Quote:They don't lay very many eggs, but so far my pullet has given me 14 eggs in 16 days, through both snowy and rainy weather. They're excellent, protective mothers, but I do hear from some people that they're not the best at actually brooding over eggs due to the long legs. I have yet to try it myself, I'm waiting until my pullet decides to go broody.

    They are indeed a slow grower, and take over a year to reach their full potential of weight, height, and volume.
     
  7. Schweiger

    Schweiger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most white egg layers have white earlobes but most games lay white eggs... what color egg is the shamo? Also what size are they? I mean thats a large bird and weighs like a small turkey but idont think they would lay a turkey sized egg. with their tall frame and sloped back how well is their fertility?
     
  8. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    I'm getting superb fertility from mine, and their odd bodies don't get in the way of mating. They lay a normal, medium sized light brown egg. These are the first two eggs I got from my pullet some time ago:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Illia,
    Do you keep these separate from the other chickens? There is one male and how many females together?
    sharon
     
  10. Schweiger

    Schweiger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thats neat. It might be the camera but the right one looks kinda white. anyway i was wondering do the shamo come in different colors that breed true like american game?
     

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