One killed by predator, now hurting each other?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dgivens, Sep 13, 2014.

  1. dgivens

    dgivens New Egg

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    Jul 8, 2013
    Northwest Indiana
    We have had six araucana hens for the last year and a half and have done pretty well with them.  Sadly, we lost our first two nights ago to what we think was a weasel. When I went to get the girls out this morning I see that several of three of them are newly injured.  Pretty significant wounds on the head for two of them and the third looks pretty rough all over, having lost a lot of feathers.  After observing them for a while, I'm wondering if these wounds came from each other.  Our hen that was killed the other night was clearly one of, if not the, leader of their group.  Is this normal?  Are they reestablishing some kind of pecking order or is something else going on?  Also is the wound in my attached pictures serious enough that it needs to be taken care of more than cleaning and some antibiotic ointment?  We are very concerned and any advice would be much appreciated. 

    pictures:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/fhpc6m2wnry1hht/IMG_9439.JPG?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/yzn7rtol5y9ild0/IMG_9434.JPG?dl=0
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2014
  2. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 2, 2013
    Texas
    My Coop
    I'd never seen pecking order squabbles get that rough. Maybe a predator? But not like you may think. Let me explain.

    I have an injured guinea right now. We're keeping a close watch on her. But the owl never made it into the coop. The coop held. But the guineas went nuts and several were injured. Mostly lost feathers and scrapes but this one has a wing that's not healing right away.

    Are yours in a coop/enclosure? Could a predator be spooking them, thus by proxy, be causing harm?

    When we have injuries, we isolate, treat (like you, antibiotic ointment, cleaning, etc.,) and give electrolytes. Isolation keeps the others from pecking at the wounds and allows more rest.

    Good luck.
     

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