opinions from experienced canners

bturbo87

Songster
9 Years
Apr 22, 2010
405
4
119
south
when i was a kid my family used to can all the time(i believe with a water bath canner). now that im grown with a family of my own, and everyone who has all the wonderful info has passed, i need some advice. i am really wanting to start canning for the family, but i would like your opinions on weather i should go for the water bath style or a pressure canner? also any feedback on which are the best/cheapest/easiest to get or work with? and any secrets all you experienced ones have on the subject that would make it easier on a new guy, stuff you have picked up over the years? thanks in advance.
 

goldenluver

Songster
10 Years
May 20, 2009
1,460
1
149
Springfield, Oregon
if you want to can a lot of different things, you're going to need both. Get a book on canning, some things half to be done in a pressure canner. I believe it has to do with the acidity of the foods.
 
Last edited:

Bridget399

Songster
10 Years
Apr 8, 2009
559
1
139
South Western PA
I personally have only ever used the water bath canner and absolutely love it. It's what my mother taught me to use, and what I'm most comfortable with. Remember, if you can't can it, you can usually freeze it! Good Luck!
 

acid_chipmunk

Polish Silkies d'Uccles O my!
9 Years
Mar 29, 2010
4,708
12
211
I would buy a big pressure canner. You can use this as a water bath canner as well, that is what we do.

If you read up on the new recommendations on canning, it is NOT safe to can low acid foods in a water bath canner. Yes, I know it was done by our parents and grandparents, but unless you want to subject your family and friends to botulism, get a pressure canner! There is no need to be afraid of the new ones, as long as you FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS!!!
 

Ivywoods

Songster
9 Years
Sep 28, 2010
2,351
20
151
Hiawatha, KS
It really depends on what you want to can. Low acid foods should be done in a pressure canner. Fruits, high acid food, etc can be done in a water bath. Jams and jellies can be done in a water bath. I have both types and use both, depending on what I am canning.

Watch for auctions. Used canners can go very cheap (as auctions go...) If you buy a used pressure canner you may want to replace the rubber seal before you use it. They can usually be found at a hardware store. Often fruit or canning jars can be bought in large amounts at auctions, too.
big_smile.png


Good luck. I love to can. Recently I got together with my two sisters for a "Sister's weekend" and we made 140 jars of jelly and jam.
big_smile.png
 

acid_chipmunk

Polish Silkies d'Uccles O my!
9 Years
Mar 29, 2010
4,708
12
211
Quote:
But, essentially, that canner is still only a water bath, not a pressure canner. So, to do low acid foods, you still need a pressure canner. Pressure canners only use about 2 inches of water in the bottom, not gallons. Water bath canners do use a lot of water, but you generally don't have the cans in there very long and once you have the water to temp, you can keep it there and do many batches very quickly.

Also, a pressure CANNER is different from a pressure COOKER. Keep that in mind.
 

CoyoteMagic

RIP ?-2014
12 Years
Apr 20, 2007
7,459
39
283
only the shadow knows.....
Quote:
But, essentially, that canner is still only a water bath, not a pressure canner. So, to do low acid foods, you still need a pressure canner. Pressure canners only use about 2 inches of water in the bottom, not gallons. Water bath canners do use a lot of water, but you generally don't have the cans in there very long and once you have the water to temp, you can keep it there and do many batches very quickly.

Also, a pressure CANNER is different from a pressure COOKER. Keep that in mind.

All I said was that it used steam. The steam seals the lids much better than the water bath method.

I have a Pressure Canner with a weighted thingie on it. I like it better than the gauge thingie that you need to have checked from time to time to make sure it correct.

Unfortunately, I haven't been able to do much canning this year. Dang drought burnt up my garden by the middle of July. 88 straight days of 90* or above and no rain from the 1st week of August until the last week of Sept!
 

Moxiechick

Songster
10 Years
Jan 15, 2010
802
21
131
Maine
You might want to contact your local Cooperative extension. I just started canning this year, and was apprehensive about it, given all that could go wrong if not done right. For most new endeavors, I'll just read up on the subject, but for canning, I wanted to see it done. Our Cooperative extension offered classes in canning. I was easier than I thought it would be, but was happy to have the experience from a knowledgeable source. Most Extensions nowadays have websites. You might want to see what they have to offer.
smile.png
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom