Opinions on roosters

Lillysmom

Chirping
5 Years
Jul 23, 2015
31
5
74
Midwest
I ordered 6 chicks that were suppose to be all hens. I already have 6 one year old Orpington hens that are very gentle. My new ones are 9 weeks old and I now know I have 2 roosters. I would love to hear opinions on keeping roosters or not. My hens are strictly for eggs and enjoyment. Also, I have small grandchildren that visit often and enjoy the hens. I've read some scary stories about roosters. Please give me any information from past experiences. Thank you!
 

K813ZRA

Songster
Mar 29, 2016
358
684
207
Pennsylvania
I ordered 6 chicks that were suppose to be all hens. I already have 6 one year old Orpington hens that are very gentle. My new ones are 9 weeks old and I now know I have 2 roosters. I would love to hear opinions on keeping roosters or not. My hens are strictly for eggs and enjoyment. Also, I have small grandchildren that visit often and enjoy the hens. I've read some scary stories about roosters. Please give me any information from past experiences. Thank you!
Well, I am new to this too as I have a mixed flock of 11 that started as 14 and a flock of Buff Orpingtons that equal 18. The mixed flock is 25 weeks old and the Orpingtons are 8 weeks old and both flocks have roo's. Two of the roo's from the mixed flock were Australorps and they were mean old toads that have since become dinner. They would try to kick at or spur me even though they did not yet have spurs, charge me and bite me. A few times they broke the skin and I just wasn't up for the hassle. Now, in my group of Orpingtons there are 3 roo's and one has been evil since day one. He likes to bite, latch on and twist. It did not hurt when he was a chick but it makes me bleed now, he got me today when I was putting them in because of a major storm (my flock has not figured out that going in the coop means safety just yet). He has a blue zip tie on his leg because he is a future meal.

That having been said, I have two roo's in my mixed flock that are quite friendly. One is an Australorp and the other is a Rhode Island red. They show no signs of human aggression and are not aggressive with each other nor the hens as of this moment. The other two Orpingtons that are roo's don't seem to be aggressive but only time will tell.

I am still undecided if I want to keep roo's. I would like to do a few hatches and keep my flock self sufficient but the temperament will decide if that is going to happen.

Good luck with your roo's.
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
10 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,503
3,598
456
NEK, VT
If you've no experience with males it's probably best to get rid of them. With small children in the equation it can test the patience of even the most gentle of lines. Generally speaking hatchery birds are more apt to have behavior problems. I've had hatchery birds and can say the roosters kept had to be caged to keep away from the kids. I've had several standard bred lines of birds and only this last line I keep are amazing with kids. I mean my little boy is a terror and has run up to and tested the rooster and my patience and none have had even a hint of aggression toward him. My boy would not be allowed to interact or only very closely monitored or through fencing with birds if I was keeping any other line of birds than I have now. Too much can happen too fast when a cock bird is at or near same height of small child. Children are unpredictable and you can easily predict how a cock with harem will behave. Not to be dramatic but keeping both of a child's eyes is preferable to keeping cock birds.
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
10 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,503
3,598
456
NEK, VT
That having been said, I have two roo's in my mixed flock that are quite friendly. One is an Australorp and the other is a Rhode Island red. They show no signs of human aggression and are not aggressive with each other nor the hens as of this moment. The other two Orpingtons that are roo's don't seem to be aggressive but only time will tell.

I am still undecided if I want to keep roo's. I would like to do a few hatches and keep my flock self sufficient but the temperament will decide if that is going to happen.

Good luck with your roo's.
Just so you know the most docile boys are typically the lowest on totem pole. Once the top cockerels are taken out they assume that role. Not to say they will be as jerky in that role as predecessor but his behavior will indeed change fast.
 

K813ZRA

Songster
Mar 29, 2016
358
684
207
Pennsylvania
Just so you know the most docile boys are typically the lowest on totem pole. Once the top cockerels are taken out they assume that role. Not to say they will be as jerky in that role as predecessor but his behavior will indeed change fast.
Thanks for the advice and yeah, I had heard that in a thread I posted. From what I understand, mine being so young have a long way to go before they show their true colors. Ever since the first one got me I have been cautious. Being a first time chicken owner if they get to be too much for me they will end up in the stew pot. I would like to keep a roo but a spur stuck in a body part does not sound fun at all!
 

BantamFan4Life

LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO.
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Jun 15, 2012
84,500
4,813
686
Pyeongtaek, South Korea
I ordered 6 chicks that were suppose to be all hens. I already have 6 one year old Orpington hens that are very gentle. My new ones are 9 weeks old and I now know I have 2 roosters. I would love to hear opinions on keeping roosters or not. My hens are strictly for eggs and enjoyment. Also, I have small grandchildren that visit often and enjoy the hens. I've read some scary stories about roosters. Please give me any information from past experiences. Thank you!
With my opinion and experience, re-home the roosters. Having young children around aggressive roosters can be dangerous. I have raised dozens of roosters, possibly even more, and I've only had 2 nice ones.
 

MANNA-PRO

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom